Homemade Lathe

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Hi,
I need to turn a piece of wood thats 4m (12') long by 50cm (20") wide (diameter). Would a piece of wood this size be suitable for turning on a lathe, if I was to make one especially for this purpose?
The item I'll be turning will be a (model) submarine hull.
Does anyone have any better suggestions?
Thanks
Michael
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Michael wrote:

I'd suggest that you tell us a bit more about what exactly you're doing. Is there a particular reason the sub can't be built up in sections? Will the hull be hollowed out? Will it be painted? What's the intended purpose?
R
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wow......Is it going into water or just a show item? For a show item I think I'd make an interior frame and skin it with veneer. Or if you can find a 24" lathe (check woodturning forums for somebody with a big One Way), turn it in sections and connect the sections..
Gary (scratching head....)
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Something like this? http://turningaround.org/18inColumn.htm however I can only do 18" by 114"
--
Art Ransom
Lancaster , Texas
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Man I'd hate to have that thing come off the lathe! What was the turning speed to rough that out?
Gary
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Even if previously hollowed out, you'd need a monster lathe to turn it. I recall that FWW once had an article on a poor man's router lathe, basically a plywood box into the ends of which the workpiece was mounted, as if between centers. A router with a dish cutting bit rode the length of the box's sides. The workpiece was turned with a crank mounted on one end. Tapers would be cut by raising or lowering the mounting at one end.
I'm sure this would be slow with much wear and tear on the router. But without specialized super heavy duty lathe equipment I don't know how else you'd do this safely in the average generalist's woodshop.
J.
Michael wrote:

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Then again, since you're building a "boat", consider the classic boatbuilder's techniques of "tortured plywood" or "cove and bead" plank on frame construction. You might then be able to carry, row or float your sub to wherever you want to display it.
J.
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On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 23:52:15 GMT, "Michael"

The last part makes no sense. All wood is useful. It is the tool that needs to be useful for the job, and I'm betting you cant afford that size of a lathe. I saw one once in an Otis Elevator production plant. Perhaps you can tell us how you are going to make a [safe] lathe that size to support that weight of wood, and have it cheap enough for a single job. I have an idea for the last part as I type.
Also since when are submarine hulls round? I'm not sure of the exact profile, but it tapers a bit towards the top I thought.
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On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 20:18:23 -0500, Guess who

Since the 50s. USS Albacore. They may have the top flattened, but surely it's easier to turn it round and then flatten the top if that's what's called for.
-Leuf
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Leuf wrote:

I suspect that the pressure hull is of a circular cross-section and the flat deck is built on top not unlike a deck one might build off of the side of a house.
--

FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

Exactly. Round hulls shrink as you go deeper. I'd no care to see, in person, what happens to an oval cross section hull. Joe
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Michael wrote:

router jig, as suggested, or a bunch of time with a drawknife....
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Isn't 4 meters more like 13 feet?
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Isn't 4 meters more like 13 feet?
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Here's a link that shows what you can do with lots of money and space... http://plamann.com/sys-tmpl/lathe/view_all.nhtml
--
JeffB
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A lathe turns things between two points. You can take the ubiquitous old Delta 12" shop lathe, use the outboard thread and faceplate, mount the tailstock on a table screwed to the floor the appropriate distance away, and countershaft the beast to desired speed. As long as you have the two points fixed in line, you're good.
A long 2x6 "tool rest" and hand planes on the columns I worked with, though router jigs and such would also work. Keep the heel of the plane on the rest, skew and go.
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: :> Hi, :> :> I need to turn a piece of wood thats 4m (12') long by 50cm (20") wide :> (diameter). Would a piece of wood this size be suitable for turning on a :> lathe, if I was to make one especially for this purpose? :> :> The item I'll be turning will be a (model) submarine hull. :> :> Does anyone have any better suggestions? :>
: A lathe turns things between two points. You can take the ubiquitous old : Delta 12" shop lathe, use the outboard thread and faceplate, mount the : tailstock on a table screwed to the floor the appropriate distance away, and : countershaft the beast to desired speed. As long as you have the two points : fixed in line, you're good.
A cylinder of the size he's considering turning is going to end up being close to 30 cubic feet. Suppose it was something light, like poplar, which is around 40 lbs/cf. That's 1200 pounds of wood. Now imagine it before it gets turned, with it not being perfectly balanced. You would need one gigantic lathe for that --
You'd destroy the Delta 12", and everything within about fifteen feet as it walks across the floor and comes apart.
Stave construction seems a much better bet to me.
    -- Andy Barss
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Me too, but if he can find a log of proper dimension, more power to him.
Having done both staved 9' and solid at 6'6" in the past on an old cast iron delta, I assure you it works if you just say yes instead of no.
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Jack up an old Chevy pickup, take one of the back wheels off, and use the hub as your faceplate.
Oh, and don't forget to wear your safety glasses. ;-)
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
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Michael wrote:

You could draw-knife it instead of turning it.
--

FF


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