Help in working with unusual material

Some friends came back from Sweden last winter raving about the Ice Hotel they had stayed in. http://www.scantours.com/ice_hotel.htm They would like to try the same thing (on a much smaller scale, of course) at their winter place in Idaho. Naturally they came to me for guidance, but I have to admit this is a new one, so I can use all the help I can get.
I've arranged for a supply of #1 Select pond ice to be delivered to the site in standard 4' x 8' x ' sheets. There are also standard 4" x 4 " x 16' sills and the appropriate number of 2 x 4s, 2 x 6s, etc. The foundations will be poured in place just ahead of the season's first big freeze, and I'd like to have as much of the ice trimmed and prefabricated to save time, as the Eskimo carpenters are quite expensive. So here are my questions:
What sort of blade should I use on the table and chop saws?
How much do you allow for melt with each cut?
Is there a way of laying out cuts on the ice? Nothing seems to make a permanent mark.
They're looking at a shingle-style design. Is there a special tool for splitting ice shingles? Should the ice be prepared in a special way? How do you determine the grain direction?
Fasteners seem to be the major problem. I'm not sure what they use in Sweden, but your standard 10d common nail will *not* work. (I've been experimenting with ice cubes.) Someone suggested using a red-hot nail to bore through the ice. Will this work? How about with the ice shingles?
I'm assuming that the ice window "glass" will be shipped in standard size panes. Is there a source for ice mullions, or should I deal with a local iceworking shop? What about putty? Is food coloring the best way to produce stained glass for the entranceway?
For the interior I was planning to use standard icewall sheets held in place with hot screws. What do you use to cover the joins? I've looked in the Thomas Register for ice spackle without any luck. Should I use an adhesive, and if so, what kind?
Flooring is also a problem. I cannot locate a source of laminate ice planking (the people at Armstrong and Pergo were positively rude when I inquired about the availability of quartersawn white oak). And how do you deal with traction problems?
Finally, I am at a complete loss as to how to heat the completed structure. The owners insist on fireplaces in each room. Is this possible? And... what about fireproofing? TIA, -- Ernie
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A warm liquid (heat to 98.6 F) will both mark and cut at the same time. Start working on your aim.
-Jack
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Thu, Jul 31, 2003, 3:53pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@no.com (JackD) says: A warm liquid (heat to 98.6 F) will both mark and cut at the same time. Start working on your aim.
Tha'll save painting later too.
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And the stained glass look won't be a problem, so long as you like pictures of marigolds and sunbeams...
Clint
(JackD) says:

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I think maybe it has to do with the intake pressure.
wrote:

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wrote:

Crosscut IF you are going to cut across the current. If you go with the flow, I'd use a regular ripping blade.

Chainsaw. Maybe a sharp nail.

I'd want the ice hard. Look at which way the current flowed when it froze; that way yoiu can determine the grain.

Well, I'd surely think some Redheads would work. Heck, just plain ole concrete anchors ought to do the job. No reason to overkill here. Ice shingles take an ice froe.

stained glass for the entranceway? Yep, food coloring works great. The mullions can be fashioned out of plastic or styerfoam. Local ice folks would be of dubious help here. And putty is no problem-use crushed ice witha little water added. I'd use a straight HSS steel router bit on the styerfoam.

Joints are covered with the crushed ice I just talked about. I wonder if Jello would work here?

Man, they had NO reason to be short with you. I'd call BBB and complain. I always use sand for traction-and sandblasting sand works best since it is sharper. Throw a rug over it til party is over.

Well, I'd serve Jack Black straight. You can heat up folks from the inside OR outside. This calls for the inside method. A little honey might help. You could install a sprinkler system if you want to for extra fire proofing if you think you really need it. Added advantage would be you could pour or spray a new floor anytime if the other one got too abraisive or worn down.

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Ernie Jurick wrote:

Why not just build some frames and make your own?

I'd suggest that you glue'em with water.
Ice doesn't really have a grain, so you're not going to be able to split shingles. Why not just use packed snow?

Kool Aid.

Give everybody ice skates.

Fireproofing is taken care of. Fireplaces are fine as long as they burn ice logs.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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have you tried rec.iceworking ???
Ernie Jurick wrote:

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Try the tip of a hot glue gun?
david
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