Help, glue up for turning.

Want to turn a gearshift knob (missing) for my daughter's 1948 Pontiac. How do I glue up some light and dark wood so I end up with a spiral or checker design. Also, what glue to use? Thanks for all replies. Ivan Vegvary
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Use yellow glue to glue up alternate layers of dark and light; mount the glue up on your lathe so it is off center; i.e, the axis of rotation is NOT perpendicular to the layers...that should give you spirals.
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dadiOH
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On Sunday, November 23, 2014 10:53:25 AM UTC-6, Ivan Vegvary wrote:


ecker design. Also, what glue to use?

Do what dadiOH said, but only after you spend a bit more time making the bl ank. The off center turning will give you a unique look, but will not give you the spiral or checker design you are asking for. In woodworking we us ually deal with only two dimensions at a time and here you need to shift in to thinking in three.
Almost all the work will be done in making the blank. Take a look here for some ideas on how to do a spiral, while he does not make a true spiral, yo u will get the idea.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v
½eU0K31hZI
A checker design might not turn out as good as you think it would, but to m ake the blank, cut a number of contrasting square pieces about two inches l onger than you want the finished object and glue up a layer of alternating strips until you have a square blank, then repeat until you have enough to make a cube, sanding the mating surfaces smooth before joining, of course. Then turn to the desired shape.
For an interesting effect, you could turn the cube from opposing corners.
Deb
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You might want to post this to rec.crafts.woodturning. One way is to cut alternating light and dark wedges and glue them together. making each layer 1/4" to 1/2" thick. Then orient the joints in each layer between the joints of the other layer when you glue them together. Adding as many layers as it take to get the height that you need. To determine the angle of the wedges, divide the number of wedges that you want to use into 360 degrees, and then divide that number by 2. Needless to say, the angles have to be EXACT, so they fit together with no gaps. This is easiest if your angles are whole numbers, trying to cut multiple 33.2 degree angles isn't easy.
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