Hearing protection with biscuit jointer

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You are quite correct in that. Studies have shown that loud rock music, which was supposed to leave all the baby-boomers deaf by 50, has had little effect. Apparently it is sudden noises, like gun shots, that do the damage. Continuous noise, like a router or music, is relatively harmless.
That said, I wear ear muffs with my lawnmower or router; usually not with my table saw.
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Would you be so kind as to point us to that study?
Barry
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in message wrote:

so, standing next to a running jet engine would be, 'relatively harmless'?
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2003 12:09:32 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

Join me in the wait for a citation. <G>
Barry
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forth from the murky depths:

Ask any doctor. Loud noises are bad for your hearing. http://a2zvocalhealth.com/soundruler.html http://www.com-coninc.com/TOO-LOUD05-22-2003.pdf http://www.abelard.org/hear/hear.htm#how-loud

HUH? WHAT'D YOU SAY?

Someone'll give you 50:1 odds on that one. I lost some of my hearing when I worked as a mechanic at an auto body shop. A few days of those air hammers on sheet metal got to me. Unfortunately, I didn't have a pair of muffs so wads of toilet paper did the trick whenever I had to be in their noisy area. I finally got some ear plugs after that. After my back was injured, I lost more hearing to tinnitus from all the aspirin and NSAIDs I was taking. I still have the loss and the tinnitus. Suckage x2.

Put 'em on! I even wear ear plugs when I go on long drives. I've found that I arrive a lot fresher since the white noise doesn't wear me down as much.
That said, maybe someone can tell me where I can find more of the tapered ear plugs. Those I have are orange and very soft foam. I bought a box of the HFT plugs and they're like 80grit sandpaper and tough as leather. Anyone want some? I'm looking for the bell-shaped plugs with the very wide bottom/outside OD. I put them in backwards and they're much more comfy to sleep in, keeping out the sound of any barking dogs or trash trucks. __ / \ | | /____\ Ain't ascii great? Feh!
--- - Sarcasm is just one more service we offer. - http://diversify.com Web Applications
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wrote:

FWIW, this is an excellent idea while flying commercial. Many folks don't realize just how loud it really is in a jet, especially back in cattle class.
Years ago, I started wearing foam plugs while flying and I couldn't believe the difference. Try it next time.
Barry
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in message

I'll may be flying in February with a 10 month old and a 2 1/2 year old (not to mention my wife). Will ear plugs work in my case as well?
todd
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2003 22:31:20 -0600, "todd"

On a whole 'nuther level!
Barry
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Larry Jaques asks:

Damned tinnitus is worse than the deafness, by far.

Try www.aosafety.com, check out the plugs they've got, and check out their "Where To Buy" listing.
Charlie Self
"Man is a reasoning rather than a reasonable animal." Alexander Hamilton
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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On 16 Dec 2003 01:09:48 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I like the 3M disposables in the aluminium case. http://rswww.com/cgi-bin/bv/browse/Module.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1579099762.1071579124@@@@&BV_EngineID cdadckefmfmkfcfngcfkmdgkldfhg.0&cacheID=ukie&3249031932249031932&stockNo@95743
They're cheap, they work, and the cases are so damn useful that I'm always buying more of them, just for the box. So I always have plenty of the plugs going spare.
For forestry, I wear these underneath my earmuffs. Hat-mounted earmuffs don't always give as good a seal as free-floating muffs, so there's sometimes a high-frequency leak around them that the foam plugs mop up.
-- What ? Me ? Evil Dictator of Iraq ? Nah mate, I'm just a Hobbit, honest
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brought

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKAP5-4025&PARTPG=INSRCM
These may be similar to what you had. I have a box of 200 pair which will probably last me years, even using them out in the garage, mowing, at drag races, etc.
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@mchsi.com says...

The set of 100 pairs I bought almost 10 years ago is just about out -- Looks like Enco will be getting an order from me, I like the orange foam plugs better than the yellow ones I have almost used up.
Yes, I do use hearing protection with most tools, the biscuit joiner is one of those tools that seems to fall into the gray area, and I was curious how others approach its use. My main issue is either having those plugs in for extended periods -- they get uncomfortable after about 45 minutes, or having to remove and put them back in multiple times.
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That's why I use earmuffs. They don't attenuate sound quite as well as the plugs, but they do a much better job of protecting hearing -- because you will use them more often because they're more comfortable and convenient.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 04:44:45 GMT, "Keith Carlson"

That looks like the beasties.

I don't need: a) $35 worth of plugs .or. b) another 400 plugs. Want to sell 10 or 12 pair? They'd fit in a #10 envelope.
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On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 22:20:24 -0700, "George M. Kazaka"

I agree to a point, no flame intended. Has your hearing ever been medically tested? You may simply be used to some loss, as you've adjusted to it over time.
I feel that hearing protection enables me to hear bad things better and earlier. For years, I could easily find a marginal driver in a massive speaker array, running full tilt, with David Clark muffs on. I've found the same to be true with tools. By lowering the overall volume, I can better hear the details of the sounds.
Barry
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message

I suffer from hearing loss as a result of an accident (surfing accident - no kidding!). Thus, I am pretty diligent about hearing protection. I wear ear plugs while riding my motorcycle. (Wind noise is prolonged 80+ decibles in the high frequency ranges that do the most hearing damage). By blocking out the high frequency noise (which are blocked effectively by hearing protection, I can hear the lower frequency noises better (car horns, truck engines, my OWN engin noises, etc) which are not affected as much by ear plugs.
I have found the effect similar in the workshop. I don't wear my ears all of the time, but ALWAYS while using my router (very loud and painful high pitch) and I can hear other noises better.
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    Greetings and Salutations.
On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 12:49:05 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

    Well, thought I would chime in with a thought here too. I have been pretty religious for quite a number of years about wearing ear protection when I expect to be near loud noises. I used to go to rock concerts back in the 60s, and, the ringing and temporary deafness afterwards was a warning to me that it could be permanent. I have a couple of sets of muffs in the shop, and, (easier to find) a box of 100 sets of corded earplugs, and, I use them.     The fact of the matter is that the ear is an amazingly sensitive instrument. It can hear the most subtle sounds, but, NOT if it is flooded with too much OTHER sound. I find that when I run the riding lawnmower, and DON'T wear protection, I can hardly hear myself think. All I hear is the roar of the motor. When I wear earplugs, I can hear the "whish" of the belts on the drives, and, the jingle of the pins holding the deck on the mower. Because I am eliminating the firehose spray of noise, I can hear the subtle variations.     In the shop, with the router, tablesaw, etc, I find the same thing holds. Granted my Unisaw is not a REAL roaring monster, but, I know that I can hear the teeth singing in the wood when I am wearing protection, and cannot hear it for the other noises when not wearing protection.     As for the "study" that says that only very sudden, loud noises cause long-term damage...I don't think I would trust even two or three studies that reported this. I would have to see a LOT of proof. It is my picture of reality that the snail-like inner ear is lined with millions of cilia, with each "hair" pickup being tuned to a different frequency. When we "hear" that frequency, the vibrations in the ear couple with the appropriate cilia, and, when the cilia wave back and forth, it stimulates a nerve and sends an impulse down the auditory nerve. Those cilia, like metal, can "fatigue" and break off...and when they do, we lose a bit of ability to sense a given frequency. The speed with which these cilia break off is a function of intensity (how far the cilia bend) and and how LONG the sound lasts (how much bending back and forth the cilia has to do). So...REALLY intense sounds, or, long-term sounds at a given frequency can cause the loss of ability to hear.     As an analogy...I could take an ax and whack your hand off at the wrist...or I could take a steak knife, and saw it off, slowly...taking a couple of days. In either case, the hand will be gone. It is my feeling that auditory damage ALWAYS happens when the sound level reaches a certain level (110 db, or something like that) and that it is CUMULATIVE...so the best thing to do is protect, protect, protect.     As another example...I used to work with Data General Nova computers, when I worked in a third-party hardware maintenance shop. The switching power supplies had this REALLY annoying whistle at about 18-20 kHz. The hardware guys could not hear it, but, it bothered the heck out of me. They did not believe me, but, I could tell them accurately when they switched the PS on and off, even if I was in another room. They worked with the sound day in and day out...and had developed "flat spots" in their hearing. Mine was still relatively intact, so I could hear the sound and they could not. It was not a LOUD sound, but, it was ALWAYS there.     Sorry for the length of posting, but, I have become kind of a Herbert about this topic. I was only given one set of ears, and, have not found where to trade them in for new so have come to believe that ear (and EYE) protection is terribly important.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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Dave Mundt wrote:

But with the steak knife you have fresh meat longer.
;]
I to have tinnitus. It's with me from the time I wake to the time I go to sleep. And it sucks. I was listening to the radio today and on comes a Xylophone (Yeah, PBS/NPR). The quality of the sound was almost eye water painful. At times the EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE is so loud it almost takes on a physical presence and I can't believe noone else can hear it.
Which of course they can't. It's all in my head.
At times it takes on a ringing like being cuffed in the ear.
And get togethers with the extended family is always a joy. Their full blooded Italians from the old country. They make so much frigging noise I can't stand it. Within a half hour I'm ready to ... do something unsocial.
I would suggest wearing hearing protection, unless you don't want to have a quiet moment again. Ever.
PS: Wife and I have changed health insurence so I'm going to start the roundy rounds with a new set of doctors. Lets see if I can get this set to do anything.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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wrotg: [snip]

I can see you've been there. For me it's the flute, and most music as played on the radio. The high frequency distorted harsh sound. Real physical pain. Yet it doesn't bother any one else. It's almost funny, it's a hearing problem yet your ears are more sensitive to some sounds than with normal hearing.

Yep, any time at all in a crowd and I'm ready to run as fast as I can to get out.

Amen
Hope you find some relief soon, and when you do, if you would be so kind to let us know what helped.
John, ringing away in Minnesota.
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John wrote:

What gets me is the noise CRTs make when they're sitting there warmed up, but not scanning. Sets my teeth on edge.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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