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I had a scary moment with my wedding ring on the back deck a few weeks ago. I was working with MDF and I knew I was wearing the expensive, titanium wedding ring when I started. Then 6 hours later, I wasn't married anymore! I don't have shop yet and so I work on the back deck. I swept every dustpile carefully, I crawled underneath the deck in the mud, and an hour later it was lost. I am still a newlywed and my wife was none too pleased. The MDF dust acted like talc and off slipped the ring.
The great thing is I found it 2 days later when I went out at night with a good flashlight and searched the herb garden next to the end of the deck. There it shone, ready to wear.
I don't do that anymore, needless to say.
Geoff Collins

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Geoff) writes:

That's the second time i hear that titanium wedding rings are extra expensive. Why? The material cannot be the reason, you get it (at 90% purity) for 37 CHF per Kg....
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Because people will pay for them? Might be a business for you to get into. I know I paid more than the price of gold for my wife's engagement ring...
--
gabriel

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On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 21:47:24 +0100, Juergen Hannappel

FASHION!
Titanium is cheaper than gold. In fact, you can get a 3 POUND bicycle frame, made of 100% Ti, for less than many people pay for a 2 oz. ring.
Barry
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And just try to get that titanium off if it's ever crushed onto your finger. The doctors and EMTs don't like trying to cut them off at all. Tom >On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 21:47:24 +0100, Juergen Hannappel

Someday, it'll all be over....
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Actually, the titanium in bicycles is alloyed with vanadium and aluminum. Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
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On 14 Jan 2004 23:27:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comEDY (Tom) wrote:

Not all of them. There have been quite a few CP frames about (although mine is 6/4).
My wedding ring was Ti. Piece of scrap that one of my friends rolled up and filed to shape for me. Never did work out how to put a decent black finish on it though.
-- Do whales have krillfiles ?
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Andy wrote:

CP meaning "commercially pure"? Sorry, but none come to mind. What frame maker is going that route? Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
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OK, it's not too bad. $149 for it and I must say it's very nice. It's very light on my finger, I don't worry about it bending and its quite comfortable.
SWMBO got all the diamonds and gold, I'm happy with Titanium.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comEDY (Tom) wrote in message

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Geoff) wrote in message

Be very careful wearing those titanium rings. My (then) fiancee and I were thinking of them until we spoke to a paramedic. If you're ever injured in the hand or finger, you may lose the finger. They can't cut them off you--too hard for their metal shears. If your finger starts to swell it'll cut off the circulation and then that's it.
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On 14 Jan 2004 23:35:11 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@dnsalias.org (Dave G) wrote:

Complete rubbish. Ti is just another metal, not kryptonite.
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Gotta tell you all about our Shipping supervisor's encounter with ring removal: The fellow said he was replacing his wedding ring, which was too small, after being mounted on his finger for 22 years. Couldn't twist, pry, soap or grease it off, so he decided to cut it away. He jams a pencil underneath the ring to stand it off his finger....and reaches for his Dremel with one of those abrasive wheels mounted on it. Me: "What about the heat....?" Him: "Wait. I'm getting to that." So he proceeds to slice through the ring, and given gold's excellent conduction of heat, breaks through at the same instant the heat really begins to burn his finger. This generates a reaction in which he places his hand in his mouth to assist in cooling. Of course, saliva and moist skin are relatively poor heat conductors, and the poor fellow burns the tip of his tongue and lower lip. Made some interesting marks on his face, I can assure you, however, there was more. As the ring was cut, internal stresses in the metal caused the band to contrict tightly around his finger, still in the "very GD hot" stage. He suffered 2nd degree burns on the root of his ring finger, which looked pretty ugly a week afterwards. This is one of those things that tickle your funny bone before moving on to the sympathy zone. My boss once said "You can find sympathy in the dictionary between sh*t and syphillis."
Tom Flyer
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--==-- wrote:

Gack!
I had to cut Dad's ring off because it was causing him pain. I used an Xacto razor saw to get most of it, then cut through with tin snips. Worked fine.
Tell your boss to try my way next time. :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net says...

The suggested method direct from Red Cross First Aid training: Get a spool of floss- pass about 12" under the ring from finger tip towards wrist. Begin wrapping the finger with floss- make it tight enough to compress the skin- spiral up the finger under the ring- tight close-together coils of floss. Keep going up until you've wrapped to the center of the 2 joints. DO NOT OVERLAP THE WRAPPINGS. When this is done, grasp the 12" end hanging from the bottom of the ring and slowly begin unwrapping by using the ring as a lever- the bottom edge of the floss should always be touching the ring bottom. The ring will slowly spiral off the finger.
Works every time (yes, I have used this method more than once) except if the ring is crushed.
/vic Then again, if I ever find the SOB that stole my dad's rings, fingers are only the first thing I'll be clipping off.
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wrote:

Here's another one: never wear rings if you work around high current DC supplies. Apparently some of the early IBM mainframes had multi-hundred amp 5V supplies where the terminals were closely spaced which lead non-zero numbers of tech's with ring fingers that were blown off when the ring closed the circuit. In this case no ring was left to be removed. There are still some systems used in various particle and nuclear physics experiments that have a similar feature 300A @ 5V supplies with the terminals spaced about 1cm apart -- scary.
It's easier to take the ring off for WW before the accident than after. That act, however, does not recuse one from being careful.
hex -30-
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (hex) writes:
[...]

but not *so* easy to touch, and at least here at CERN you are supposed to add a wrning sign "Danger, extra low voltage". But if you consider the dangers of an ordinary power cable: If you touch a loose end with your bare finger you will get a small burn (maybe) and jerk it away, but the ring might cause the short-circuit current to flow, which can easily reach a few thousand amps before the breaker kicks in.

Much better not to wear any rings or oher jewelry at all, since danger lurks everywhere and bites often when least expected, and the jewelry never helps you: If you are beautiful by yourself it only distracts, if not it only makes you attractive to thieves...
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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On 16 Jan 2004 18:20:10 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (hex) wrote:

I used to work in telephone exchanges. Power was supplied at 50V, through huge copper bus bars, made from 1" thick copper, either 6" or 12"high. They weren't insulated and they were only an inch or so apart.
-- Do whales have krillfiles ?
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(Slightly OT)
I had my wedding band on a total of 1 day on our honeymoon when I went surfing and a wave made it slip right off into the water. (And please, let's not go into whether surfing is foolhardy or not again on this group!) I dove under and barely managed to grab it for a second before it slipped out of my hand, lost forever. The 2nd band my wife bought lasted about another week before it came off when surfing again. Were these rings trying to tell me something? In any case, while she forgave both incidents and bought a 3rd ring, I have to this day to wear it in the water, the shop, or anywhere else! This, however, she does not like!
Cheers! Duke
snipped-for-privacy@wmich.edu (Nancy A. Kroes) wrote in message

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Angelo Castellano posting wrote:

That's why I don't try to stop moving machinery with my left hand. :)
Being aware of the ring and actively working to protect it from harm is IMHO sufficient to avoid catching it on anything. I don't want to get it scraped up. It belonged to my great grandfather.
Good argument for taking it off, granted, but I always lose track of it when I do. It and a watch are the only jewlry I ever need.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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IMHO
when
Same here (well, except that the ring doesn't have that much sentimental value). I always take my ring off, pop it onto my watch band, re-do the watch band, and put the pair of them on top of the microwave in the kitchen (right on the path to the gara^H^H^H^Hshop). Same thing I do in the shower, at night, and any other time I don't want to wear them (excepting that they might be on the headboard or sink, instead). Keeping a pattern -- and attaching the ring to something else! -- prevents it's loss.
--randy
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