Happy 20th, Nahm

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Karl said:

If the case was red, it's a Freud. Yet considering the sponsers of the show, I would expect a the new Dewalt with black tape over the logo.
Greg G.
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I have noticed that TOH is going strong with Festool these days.
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Leon said:

I've seen the ads and promos. The whole concept of Festool kinda flies in the face of the widely held belief (in this country) that you can't sell a product unless it is a cheap Chinese POS marketed at Wally World. Seems the Stanleys and B&Ds of the world are more interested in repeat small profits on mass volumes rather than reputation and more profit on smaller volumes. Ah, gotta love those publicly traded US corporations and their idiot boards when they ride another brand name down the tubes.
I've looked at the Festool product line in person, but have used none of them. They appear to be very well constructed. Heavy gears and housings. The Domino stands out as the most uniquely valuable of the lot. The saw is kinda gimmicky for my needs, but the homeowner who doesn't need a table saw or the lightweight professional in the field would likely find it more valuable.
Also, Powermatic/WHM Tools is now sponsoring a new series on PBS called the Woodsmith Shop. The first episode air in my area was today. It was uneven and the hosts stilted. The show was about tuning bandsaws, yet I found it rather ironic that they chose a blade with a bad weld to use while filming the show. It about drove me up the wall whenever they powered it up. Either they're just getting their sea legs, or it needs a new producer that isn't also a CEO.
So to wrap that back around to Norm, they have a winner in him, and B&D had better watch it lest WMH Tool Group outbids them as a sponsor. It could prove to be a crippling blow to Delta.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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Ah, gotta love those

SNIP
Yeah, FWIW, look what WMH is doing to the Performax brand.
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George said:

Please enlighten; as only one man I can hardly keep up with so much muckraking and corporate plundering without some help. :-\
Greg G.
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wrote:

He may be referring to some of the Performax equipment now sporting a Jet name.
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Leon said:

Well hell, that's no problem, Leon. As long as some semblance of quality remains. I have noticed that the castings for the Jet/Powermatic bandsaws and such are exactly the same. Different color and accessories. And better QC than Delta has managed thus far.
Greg G.
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wrote:

Just for you and the others too lazy, consider the following: http://www.performaxpowertools.com /
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George said:

Well, thanks for the link, but the implication that we are "too lazy" to surf the web looking for obscure critiques which may be real or imagined is rather impudent. Many here work and access the net in 30 second spurts; not everyone is a retiree who has all day to surf for referenced trivia. Nor is it a classroom where research is a constituent element of the graded curriculum.
That aside, I about choked when I saw the site. On that point, you are correct. The lowest common denominator apparently reigns supreme.
Greg G.
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Greg G. wrote:

Not at all.
It appears that WMH is trying to create several distinct brands.
At first glance, I can see them positioning Powermatic as the top end, Jet as a serious hobby to small-shop pro, and Performax to a the portable, contractor market, maybe with some entry level stuff.
Notice that the Performax drum sanders are renamed to Jet, and do not remain with the portable tools.
To me, this seems like a rather logical brand rearrangement, rather than evidence of "racing to the bottom".
It all makes a lot more sense to me than General adding "International" to the name plate or Delta adding "Shopmaster" to the decal. More often than not people totally missed the added word and considered them the real deal, rather than a lower-end alternative to the flagship brand.
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I don't see it that way, at least now with General. Most anybody that's doing research online has some knowledge about what they want and are just checking out the differences in function, details and price. Considering what most big iron costs, people are pretty particular about what they buy and don't usually pull the trigger at the first product they see. It's pretty obvious when you see the price discrepancy difference between General and General International that there's a distinct difference between the two. That's plenty of information for someone to dig deeper for additional details.
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Upscale wrote:

I agree, it should be obvious. My comments were drawn from experience of many forum messages from people who seemed confused.
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wrote:

And as one who has been through it, you are right, statistically speaking. When a company does not clearly differentiate between their various lines, blurring occurs in the market place. The ususal outcome is that the top line suffers damage. This also happens to be where the margins are usually highest and where the firms reputation is anchored.
The big box junk at the bottom of the totem pole gets placement in the home centers based on the reputation of the firms top line. But margins get squeezed by the 800 lb. gorilla. You're not making any money, but the volume is growing to the point you have to have it. Then someone comes along and offers the gorilla a similar product for a penny less and he gives them your shelf space. But by now, folks are beginning to doubt the quality of your top line, so you have trouble across all the lines.
The best strategy is to completly separate the lines with absolutley no link bottom to top.
Frank
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You could be right, but I think it depends on how one looks at it. When you buy from a car dealership, there's products for the thrifty person and the person with large quantities of disposable income. As with most companies. Only difference on a website is that the printed word doesn't register in the mind nearly as fast as the visual image and that's where the internet falls down ~ at least for now. Don't forget, the internet is barely twenty years old and old farts like us have to reorder our thinking to prevent falling into the online pitfall of instant gratification. I wonder if kids who have grown not knowing any period when the internet did not exist have the same trouble we have?
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Upscale wrote:

There is a range, but did you ever notice that Toyota and Lexus cars are sold from different properties? The same goes for Infinity and Nissan.
Scion, as a newly created "hip", but lower-end brand, is sold by specific folks, in a specifically decorated "dealership within a dealership".
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In Houston it is not uncommon to see Cadilliacs and Buicks side by side on the show room floor. For a while the closest Cadillac dealer had Cadillac, Buick, GMC, and Hummer. More so with American built cars you see a mix of the product lines.
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Leon wrote: ...

Here all of those plus Chevy and Toyota...
What's the point of this? There are even dealerships I know of w/ mixed Chrysler/Ford/GM/Toyota/U_Pick_It on the same floor...
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The point, variety to offer the customer. Competition if fierce in Houston. The more you have to offer the more likely you will sell something.
Keep in mind also that many brands have closely tied relationships.
Mazda and Ford build products for each other, Toyota, Suzuki, Isuzu, Chevrolet, and Honda have all built for each other at some scale. Several years ago the Chevy Nova was built by Toyota. Honda purchased the original Passport from Isuzu but oddly Isuzu did not build that vehicle, Chevrolet built all of them, The Blazer, Rodeo, and Passport.
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dpb wrote:

Different brands...
There is no $20000 Lexus, and there's no $80000 Toyota.
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<<There is a range, but did you ever notice that Toyota and Lexus cars are sold from different properties? The same goes for Infinity and Nissan.>>
When Acura was introduced into this country, the existing Honda dealers had first crack at the franchises, but there was a catch: the Acura dealership could not be located in or adjacent to the same town as that dealer's Honda facility. So, for example, Schaller has a Honda showroom in New Britain but had to locate their Acura store in Manchester. I'm sure they would have preferred Morande's location, but it wasn't allowed.
Lee
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