Hand tingles from using vibrating tools

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Well guys, thanks for the replies. My hand no longer tingles. I did purchase anti-vibe gloves, and wrapped rubber weather seal around the grab bar. I guess it works to some extent. Anyway, appreciate the replies.
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You might also get better tools. For example, the Porter Cable 505 is a half sheet sander that has so little vibration that it passes the nickle test. You can sand all day with no tingle when you stop.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
http://www.epinions.com/content_15608614532
The current Fine Woodworking Tool Guide also rates vibration levels for orbital sanders.
On 13 Nov 2006 07:45:58 -0800, smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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Thank you. The sanders I'm usually okay with. The concrete angle grinder is the worst. I believe it's from the acceration of the vibrations. It's a Bosch and I've always liked Bosch tools and this product produces virtually no dust. I guess we live and learn. I really hate having weird "nerve problems" IE tingles, that's why I was concerned.
Again, thank you.
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smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Not normal, that could be indicative of Raynaud's disease (OK, strictly it's secondary Raynaud's phenomenon, not the disease, but that's close enough for Usenet).
An hour or two afterwards is typical. It's not good for you, and if it's a regular occupational problem then you (or your employer) should fix this, or you're at risk of future problems akin to "vibration white finger".
If you're experiencing more than an hour, even after a long day's grinding, then you have a personal physiological issue that's making you extra-sensitive to it. Do you have "poor circulation", an unusual susceptibility to cold, or does your skin turn blue white or red? Like any of these exposure-related problems, don't ignore it today or you'll pay the cost in a few years time.
If you're getting a couple of _days_ sensation afterwards, then you have a problem.
As to practical measures assuming you're going to use the tools anyway, then there's an awful lot you can do:
Change the process. If it vibrates, don't do it. Don't saw it, slice it. Don't do it under power, do it more slowly by hand. Take up planing by hand rather than using that noisy powermuncher. Quieter too.
Change the technique. Switch from a hammer drill to an SDS drill (more drilling, less vibration). Use an abrasive flapwheel rather than a rigid disk.
Change the tool. Compare a cheap angle grinder and a Metabo. Compare a delta sander and a Fein Multimaster. This is the one big reason why I buy expensive power tools, not cheapies.
Change the handles. Many better tools (notably Bosch) use side handles with anti-vibration inserts. These are also sold separately and will fit other makers' models. Most of my own powertool handles are wrapped in 5mm neoprene sticky tape, sold as pipe lagging.
Wear gloves - there are lots of anti-vibration gloves out there, ranging from inflatable airbags (isolated, but poor control) to gel pads (reasonable) or even deep freeze gloves (poor vibration resistance, but dirt cheap and you've no excuse not to).
Limit your exposure. Stop for breaks. Don't use that technique for so long in a day that you get "fizzy fingers" -- stop and do something else instead.
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