Grounding Dust Collection System

I just purchased a dust collection system and in the manual it says to stop static you need to ground it. I have read in different books about grounding the pipe also. Can someone point me in the right direction on how this is suppose to be done?
Thanks Rob
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Good one.
Gus, Steve, and Homer are experts and will be glad to help you...if they aren't too busy arguing about what the meaning of "is" is.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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LRod wrote:

I'll let that one go - for now.
Gotta give my TS a new coat of Cream of Tartar. You know, it actually lubricates that table pretty well.
Thanks for the tip, buddy.
Steve
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Or you could ignore it. It won't explode.
Grounding insulated plastic pipe is a PITA. Forget it.
You can run an internal ground strap, but it achieves little, snags shavings, and the dust will wear through it in time.
If you really have static problems, run an external ground wire and ground the metal components of the plumbing. Ungrounded these will act like capacitors and build up a much worse charge than the insulating plastic.
If you absolutely _must_ avoid static, switch to conductive plastic or metal for your DC. But you don't need to.

Hi Rob Tork ! Do we know each other ?
(and if we do, where do you fit a DC into a caravan ?)
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I wonder if you could paint it with conductive paint?

Where does one find conductive plastic? Does such a thing exist?
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In a plastics factory - you have to go back that far in the process, even before the moulding stage - you can't change one to the other.
Basically you just fill the plastic with carbon powder. It's a lousy conductor, but it's enough to remove static. Look at the packaging for electronic components. If a plastic is anti-static conductive, it'll be black.
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 11:01:36 +0000, Andy Dingley

Andy, I heard on the radio briefly the other day that someone has refined this, and they now have a very effective plastic conductor. Unfortunately I can't recall any more details.
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Or pink. The newer antistatic stuff I've been receiving is pink. The foam has a slight "soapy" greasy feel.
There IS a way around the static issue on synthetic materials:
I was having a problem with static electricity buildup in my office a few years ago. When I watched a nice fat spark jump from my screwdriver to a microprocessor board I was working on ... well, let's just say I wasn't happy. Killed the board.
I did something few are willing to do ... I thought about the problem, including taking an inventory of on-hand materials that would help me.
I ended up mixing up a solution of liquid fabric softener and water (1 part fabric softener to 4 parts water) and put the mixture into a spray bottle. I sprayed the entire carpet with this solution and let it dry.
Static problem resolved.
I did have to re-apply the solution the next year ... but haven't had any problems since. I'm now enjoying my 4th static-free winter.
****
Now, for those ready to pound their keyboards because I'm talking about carpet, not PVC ducting ... hold on. If you take the same mixture and spray the outside of the DC ducting, you will give all those little electrons a happy place to travel, rather than herding them up in bunches. No shock, because no charge buildup. No charge buildup because you gave the electrons a path to follow.
****
For the black pepper sorters out there ... it really doesn't matter what fabric softener you use. Remember that most fabric softeners advertise their ability to "reduce static cling". My wife had a bottle of "Snuggles" in the laundry room, so I used it. Some people may not like the perfume added to the fabric softener ... choose one without the perfume.
Now, go into your shop and make some stuff!
Rick
(for those interested, I replaced the defective surface mounted IC that popped on the microprocessor board, and it lived happily ever after.)
Andy Dingley carefully crafted the following:

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Rugh-Roh - someone didn't ground themselves...

Yup. Except that many have done that exact thought process years and years ago. That has been a pretty common treatment of static prone carpteted areas for at least 20 years. Not perfect, but effective.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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