Grinder Replacement

I've been using a slow speed grinder to sharpen chisels and planer blades. I took it off to a job site and it got stolen. Now I need a replacement. A friend gave me a 3600RPM grinder that I was thinking about throwing an aluminum oxide wheel on. Would 3600 be too fast? Is it work buying the wheel? Anybody use a full speed grinder for sharpening irons?
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I think you'll burn the crap out of your irons and chisels at that speed. They make slow speed grinders for a reason.
Scott
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First of all, as a contractor I feel your pain about job site theft. No matter who took your grinder, I hope you find out who it was and beat him to death with the same grinder.
For a grinder used as a sharpener or reprofiler, I think slower is better. A less aggressive machine is always a good idea on a cutter as you can easily burn the metal or take too much off.
Most of the guys in the woodturning group I know use this one, including me:
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2004605/19002/8-Slow-Speed-Grinder.aspx
or same link if the wrap munges:
http://tinyurl.com/nt5hgj
I have two, and one I have had for about 10 years. The wheels are good, not great, but certainly serviceable. Be aware; they aren't Norton type wheels. You will need to true them up.
The good news is the oldest grinder still runs like the day I bought it, and the original wheels last a really long time. Some of the guys in the club still have the same wheels that came with the grinder after years of moderate use.
This one is easy on the pocket book, too.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

...
Okay, anybody any experience w/ any one or more of the Tormek knock-offs?
--
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"dayvo" wrote:

I feel your loss.

YES.
IMHO, a 1"-2" x 40" lg vertical belt sander is far more useful for sharpening.
Lew
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If you are used to using a grinder for your particular tasks dayvo and want to continue to do so, have at it.
But Lew is 110% correct. For cutting implements that require flat surfaces, a sander is VASTLY superior to a grinder in just about every way.
When I tangle with a really hard door in a hardware retrofit, it isn't unusual for me to roll back the edge (or chip an edge) on a hard oak door. Not to mention an errant nail or screw you find from a previous repair....
I always resurface and reshape the edge with my sander unless my chisel looks like Alfred E. Neumann's teeth. Then it is grinder first, sander second.
Beware though. Grinding on the sander generated MORE heat than the grinder, but cuts much cleaner. Just sharpen a bit more slowly.
Of course, just my 0.02.
Robert
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A slow grinder is forgiving, but 3600 RPM grinders have been around forever and have sharpened lots of tools and bits.
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wrote:

You can use 3600 rpm for mower blades and such, but for a gouge or chisel you can still use it but you need to develop a light touch. I think Woodcraft has a slow-speed grinder for less than $100. If you take it on site, paint it bright pink so nobody will think about stealing it. ;-)
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On Sat, 29 Aug 2009 20:02:08 -0400, Phisherman wrote:

The Woodcraft grinder is especially good if you catch it on sale. Not much more than the price of the two wheels that come with it.
As far as speed, I like the slow speed, but the instructions that come with my Wolverine sharpening jig say high speed is fine. I would think their experience trumps mine.
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Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Larry Blanchard wrote:

FWIW, the Harbor Fright Tormek clone works quite well--it's not as convenient as a Tormek and the blade needs a few strokes on a stone afterward to get a surgical edge, but for 80 bucks it's a bargain, and using a wet stone it presents no risk at all of burning.
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I'm Very happy with my Woodcraft grinder.. and like you said, when it was on sale for $65 with free shipping, I bought it instead of replacement wheels for my high speed grinder..
The biggest sharpening breakthrough for me was realizing the difference between grinding and sharpening.. My tools last a lot longer now.. lol
mac
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Sharpening chisels and planer blades is a whole different department than sharping/touching up turning tools. I say slow speed ,white A/O wheel for chisels and plane blades , touching up turning tools, high speed/gray wheel is fine. OTOH I do remember our wood shop teacher using the 6" belt sander to touch up turning tools. Thanks, Tony
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