Grad Student Writing Paper on Branding and Looking for Opinions On Disston

I’m a grad student doing a project on branding. I’ve decided to focus on Disston Tools. Apparently, Disston is in the same situation that Black and Decker was years ago: Black and Decker owned the DeWalt brand name and decided to launch it so they could develop professional notoriety, and they did.
It appears that Disston is in a similar situation with their Blu-Mol and Disston brands.
They are thinking that Disston could be the next DeWalt, but do not have the notoriety issue in that the Blu-Mol brand is positioned well (I think) in the minds of consumers and pros. I’m inclined to think that they should build on the Blu-Mol brand and maybe offer a sub brand in Blu-Mol Xtreme as they have done in the past due to the small but existing brand awareness.
My questions: Who among you recognizes Disston? With enough time and money, one can launch any name as a brand, but why spend the money launching another brand (Disston) if you can make a power brand out of Blu Mol?
I am very interested in hearing what do you think and thank you for your help.
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On 10/18/2011 9:15 AM, Dori wrote: ...

Anybody of any age at all and experience will/does know Disston.
Who/what the he-double-hockey-stick is Blu Mol?
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On 10/18/2011 9:15 AM, Dori wrote:

an association with Disston would improve product sales. Is Disston a "power" brand??? Not in my opinion.
When I think Disston I think low end entry level.
Many years ago Black and Decker and DeWalt both were pretty good brands, Black and Decker however seems to have put more focus in to pop corn poppers and coffee machines in the past 30 years. Still I would consider Black and Decker over Disston. Actually I would be more likely to buy Blu-Mol over the Disston brand.
What if Dollar General bought JC Penney, would you be more likely to buy at JC Penney than you are now?
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On 10/18/2011 9:37 AM, Leon wrote: ...

I remember/think of the Disston of earlier years when were the dominant saw maker.
A case of being unable to adapt to changing times after WW II and the advent of the skilsaw and an abortive attempt to get in chainsaws and other areas.
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2011 09:37:29 -0500, Leon wrote:

When I think Disston, I think old hand saws :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On 10/18/2011 12:49 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

In 1978 I had, actually still have floating around here a Disston electric screw driver. About 2" in diameter and about 16" long.
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To handsaws what Bailey was to planes.
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Dori wrote:

I thought "Blu Mol" was something you had excised by a dermatologist.
If Disston wants an immediately-recognizable brand name, they should consider "Benz" or "Boeing" or even "Pop-Tart."
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Disston is the more valuable brand name for a number of reasons, a rather illustrious hand saw history not the least of them. It also sounds better than Blu-Mol. Do not underestimate the value of a strong sounding name.
R. Yale Worthington, IV
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On 10/18/2011 11:14 AM, RicodJour wrote:

Normally true but do you know what products have the Disston brand name today? Hand saws are not included.
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e.g.: "Kodak", chosen entirely at random based on the strength of the hard "K" and "D" sound, and the alliteration.
-Zz
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On 10/18/2011 9:15 AM, Dori wrote:

I really can't let that go by, either. B&D certainly owned/got far more than just the DeWalt brand name when purchased the company in the early '60s.
I think you need to look at far more depth here...
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2011 14:15:28 +0000, Dori wrote:

product for me was industrial planer knives, they were incredible, no better industrial knife could be had at any price they had a surface finish not seen before or since, in such products.
They were sold under the brand name Disston-Philbrick, but as a retail brand it is probably worthless, only old geezers know the name.
basilisk
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2011 14:15:28 +0000, Dori

Recognize it? Some members of my family worked for Disston back in the 1940's and 50's. My wife went to Disston school and our kids played at Disston playground. They are of course, on Disston Street.
My association with the name is quality hand saws. May have changes since then though.
In September 1872, Henry Disston and two other men dug part of the foundation for what was to become the largest saw manufacturing facility in the world: Disston Saw Works. This was in the Tacony section of Philadelphia. Having previously moved his expanding business from near Second and Market Streets to Front and Laurel Streets, Disston sought to establish his business away from this cramped area. It took over 25 years to move the entire facility to Tacony. This Philadelphia neighborhood seems to have been the only company town in the United States established within an existing city. Henry Disston was renowned for having one of the first industries that exhibited environmental responsibility, as well as a paternalistic view towards his employees. For example, he had thousands of homes built in Tacony for his workmen. Funds to purchase these homes were made available through a building and loan association set up by the Disston firm. Mr. Disston was ready to grant any assistance needed to see to it that his workers could purchase a home, even if advances needed to be made. Other examples of Henry Disston's caring influence on the community was evident in everyday life. To meet employees' cultural needs, a hall and a library were built with Henry Disston agreeing to pay a fixed sum towards its maintenance. The Tacony Music Hall was erected in 1885, also with the assistance of Disston money.
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Very interesting. Thanks for sharing that.
If Disston got back to those roots, instead of sullying their name with 'eh' products, people would buy them. It wouldn't be "launching another brand", it would be resurrecting the original one. A much better story for marketing to sell.
R
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On 10/18/2011 9:35 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote: ...

The lesson didn't take very well,unfortunately...his son Hamilton was kingpin in the "opening" of Florida. At one time the largest land-owner in the US, he was the head of the consortium that began the massive draining of swamps and development in central FL. IIRC, had something like 6- or 7000 sq _miles_ of the state at one time. He's also the one that basically bankrupted the Disston company by using loans against the company (unbeknownst to rest of the family) to finance his FL adventures.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/woodworking/Grad-Student-Writing-Paper-on-Branding-and-Looking-for-Opini-525965-.htm Dori wrote: Thank you, all, for taking the time to share your impressions with me. I appreciate the fact you did. Your comments were informative and helpful.
Thank you again.
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On Tue, 25 Oct 2011 15:34:56 +0000, Dori

So how about posting a link to the paper once you're done and graded, Dori?
-- Learning to ignore things is one of the great paths to inner peace. -- Robert J. Sawyer
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Yes I recognize Disston as one of the best sawmakers ever. First Henry Disston, then (Henry?) Disston and son, later Disston and sons. If I were to buy a new saw, and I can't imagine why I would want to, I'd look for a Disston.
ISTR having seen Blu Mol something on the shelf (drill bits maybe?) but have no opinion on them.
--
FF

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On 11/4/2011 2:01 PM, Fred the Red Shirt wrote: ...

...
Assuming by new you mean newly manufactured, not simply new to you, that'll be tough since it's been _a_long_time_ since they last made new saws--I know there were a few cheaper made for a while up until, what, sometime in the 60s, maybe???? perhaps a little longer???
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