Golden Rectangle

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Thanks Larry, I usually do my book shopping on foot, I wind up with *lotsa* books that way...
MC&HNY,
Grogs
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brought forth from the murky depths:

I keep getting ideas here and buying from half.com, so books are $4-7 with shipping. I also get monthly newspapers from edwardrhamilton.com and often buy 3 or more at a time so the ghastly total shipping cost (a brutal $3.50 per shipment) is less painful.
- They who know the truth are not equal to those who love it. -Confucius --- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Programming Services
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That half site is Wicked. Went to buy ONE book (ok, maybe two) and $300 later...
Renata
On Sat, 10 Jan 2004 03:34:23 GMT, Larry Jaques

smart, not dumb for email
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forth from the murky depths:

Don't go to Hamilton. They had a dozen TauntMe books there and I ended up with one of each. (Taunton DOES make good books, wot?) I only wish I'd picked up that copy of "Making and Modifying Machines" when I had a chance. The one on *b*y is only $99.99!
- They who know the truth are not equal to those who love it. -Confucius --- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Programming Services
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For those of us with only an elementary education, I will try and elucidate and educate what Tom is talking about and note long or foreign words to be committed to memory for use confounding and impressing enemies and friends alike .
wrote:

In other words which came first.....note "Ex post facto" [after the fact]

Again the formula fits the form not vica versa ....several good words priori [preexisting], posteriori [not sure of this one], codified [rule]

Personally I have heard of the fellow but sadly never seen a picture of him . enculturated eye, similar to uncultured eye, meaning bubba and them. Formulaic...[mathermeratical ]

Orders of Architecture [Architecture, ancient Greek leader,5th century BC]
the best in western thought about the relationship of forms ....mainly concerns nude wimmin as we are all aware

I know one has to do with rabbits, the golden mean, not quite sure but possibly about $400 an ounce.

Basically, check out home depot.
Note "visually organic" [looking at unfertilized plants]

I missed this one ,for sure we are not mathematicians, or leaders as mentioned before or even his secretary who has lost her shorthand book

Up is ok ,flat a no no .

In other words watch the playboy channel as much as possible.

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There we go again, coffee all over the damn monitor from your post ... at least that's what an a posteriori examination suggests.
It's two words, used together, not one. ;>)
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And to beat Lawrence or Larry to the punch, NO, I didn't blow coffee out my *ss.
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I recommend, How to design and construct period furniture by Franklin H. Gottshall. Gottshall reviews the rules of design and demonstrates how they were formed from specific examples of period furniture. The book is invaluable just for the design rules, many of which are common sense, that are outlayed in the beginning chapters. He also reviews pieces that violate the rules of design and yet are very visibly appealing. The book is out of print but available at many libraries and of course at amazon.com.
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thanks! there's a new library opening up on the 17th. I'll put that on my list of things to look for.
dave
McQualude wrote:

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As far as design goes then the primary concern should be the functional aspects, asthetics are basically a secondary consideration, if it is possible to combine the two well and good.
The artical in FWW does show some examples of design in the authors view that complies to the golden ratio. In the example of the chest on cupboard shown as an instance of the golden ratios use, the proportions in my view are quite poor, at least not pleasing to my laymans eye. mjh
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Successful designers do combine the two. The functional aspect of most furniture is fairly straitforward, leaving a lot of latitude for design.

I missed the article in FWW, but I've read "Furniture By Design" by Blackburn which I found to be of little practical value in designing furniture. Blackburn's writing style was very dry, to the extent that it was laborious to finish each chapter. Probably only 5% of the book discusses design. Clearly to me, many of the projects he passes off as contracted work were actually personal projects. There is a glut of his book available on Amazon at a fraction of the cover price.
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Inhale. Exhale. This is s'posed to be fun. You get to figure out how to make a square shape look like two smaller rectangles that conform to "some predetermined idea of what pleasing ought to be."
Dave, the Golden Rectangle is not the only pleasing proportion. Any proportion in the Fibonacci series is pleasing to the eye.
You're setting your legs in from the top about (?) an inch and a half or so, giving you a visual length of the front-on rectangle of 23 inches. Your over all height is 24 inches. You've basically got a square, yes? Seems to me you've got two options:
Option 1. Throw out the length and go to 36 inches or so. That makes the front-on view of the table an almost perfect "Golden Rectangle" and the top-- 16 by 36-- approximately a 1 to 2 ratio which are the first two numbers in the Fibonacci Series. BUT, I'm getting that you feel you're stuck with the overall height and length, so you need a different solution...
Option 2. Fool the eye.
Stretchers, Dave. If you're stuck with an almost square 24 high by 23 long front-on view, divide the square visually with stretchers-- or maybe an elegant floating shelf?-- placed, (in your case) right around 14-1/2 to 15 inches off the floor. This breaks up the front view into two rectangles. The lower will be 14.5 by 23-- a perfect golden rectangle, and the upper "rectangle" (between the stretchers and the table top), will be around 10 by 23ish which is around 1-to-2, again, the first two numbers in the Fibonacci Series.
I know you don't do "plans," but if you'll do a quickie sketch of this idea to scale on paper, you'll see why those of us who do, do. ;>
Michael ...Or you could just build it squarish, call it studio furniture, put a sign on it that says "Fibonacci's Nightmare - $5,000" and call it a good day's work. :)
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Michael,
Thanks for your ideas. As I was reading, it suddenly hit me that there is going to be a lower shelf about 6" off the floor that will break up the "rectangle" formed by the legs. Also, I can't change the depth or the height of the table. The shelf would be the "stretcher".
:) I don't "do" plans, but I did crib much of the style from a picture I got off Google Images. For me, pictures are just another form of a plan; just no step by step directions. There will be a drawer which pretty much requires that the aprons be at least as high as the drawer. The aprons will enclose the drawer so I guess another rectangle is described by the space between the lower edge of the apron and the bottom shelf. Make sense?
dave
Michael Baglio

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