Gloat and Question

I don't post here often but I most respect the knowledge base here. I got called by a friend to go to a manufacturing shop the other day where they were selling some old equipment. One building they had leased got sold to someone else! I got a large old (decent) B&D 5hp RAS, a Rockwell/Delta DP with the variable speed head, about a 16x20 table, and OLD Wallace mortiser (looking for more chisels/bits) and two glue welders. And that brings up the question, what am I going to do with the glue welders? Is anyone familiar? Oh, yeah, I paid $250 for the lot. Respectfully, Ron Moore
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Edge plywood? Or are you referring to the type which cure glue by radio frequency energy? http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Bonding_with_Radio_Frequency_Heating.html
Jut about all the suggestions you'd ever need. http://www.redbookonline.com/charts/woodglue.pdf
And that brings up the question, what am I going to do with

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The info under example #2 (woodweb) looks closest. Both boxes have a handheld unit that has two parallel bars or rollers about 2" apart. The pistol grip has a trigger to enable it. I'm told that it was used to fast dry a water/powder based glue and used on tongue and groove flooring. Each box has a milliamp meter, one to 600ma, the other to 800ma. It does appear to be an rf unit as the power is apparently transfered to the bars by a coil coupling. If so, does it still have practical application? Ron
George wrote:

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Yep. Where you need a fast bond, and want to pay the glue, it's great. Was nice for the 2-hour class blocks back when, because you could get the basic-glue-ups done in one day.

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The glue was powdered urea resin, and AFAIK it's still available today, however the brand names escape me ATM. It used to be the glue of choice of boatbuilders because it was considered waterproof. According to one source located by google its no longer considered that but still used extensively by boaters. It will not withstand boiling water either, whatever that means. Dont know too many people who boil their boats.
Had occasion to use it one time on a stereo cabinet, with the RF cure. Was indeed very quick and strong.
The glue does not require RF to cure. 24hrs wait time will do it. Long open time was just right for stave type column glue-ups that were then turned on a lathe.
As to a practical use for this thing, other than it's intended purpose, I dont know. It acts on moisture to create considerable heat in the wood, so maybe, for small pieces, a type of kiln effect?
wrote:

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You are correct -- I am currently building a weekender sailboat, and we are using the powered urea resin glue. It is considerably cheaper than epoxy, which is the other construction choice, but very brittle. I think they use it for veneering as well. That might be a good use for it -- quick drying veneer if you don't have a veneer press? If your boat is falling apart because you are sailing through boiling water, something very very bad has happened.
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Ron Moore wrote:

We still use a glue welder (at work of course). You could go about finding a commercial shop and sell them off. More than likely you could re-coup your investment.
Enough about that crap though. The radical alarm saw sounds nice and so does the drill press but I'd be more interested in the Wallace mortiser. Looks like this?
http://owwm.com/PhotoIndex/detail.asp?id 61
Got any dirty paper on it?
http://files.owwm.com/PDF/Wallace/Mortiser09.pdf

Respectfully?, bite me/you suck/why don'tcha just go jumpin' up and bite me in my ass? I mean really, if you can't sell the wood welders and come out of this with some free 'chinery, you're dogging it. No really.
Oh, and did I mention, you suck?
UA100
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    That is EXACTLY the old mortiser. Thanks for a view of the lit, as well. How hard is it to find tooling for or will other's work?     I am printing the entire message for future reference, like when SWMBO finds out about my "find". Maybe that will help.     Thanks again for the info. Ron
Unisaw A100 wrote:>

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Ron Moore wrote:

I'm not sure of a fit for it. Seems to me you're a prime candidate for participation in/on the OWWM.

Oh sure, and have her name me as your enabler at the divorce proceedings.
Thanks.
UA100
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most white and yellow wood glues will work with these. they use rf waves to excite the glue, causing heat to set the glue between the rollers. this tack welds the joint, but you have to let the rest of the glue dry as normal. bob
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All you're missing is the weeping widder wimmen. But I guess taking advantage of some recently unshopped souls is about the equal.... Nice suckage!
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So these glue welders are like a microwave oven for fast glue setting?

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wrote:

The Voc. school woodworking class I'm taking has one, and it looked like a lot of fun for a home shop, especially since you've already got it. The instructor edge-glued about three panels with it in about 3-4 minutes, and they were strong enough to run through the thickness planer immediately. You still've got to clamp them when gluing, and they still take 24 hours to fully cure, but I imagine that it could sure cut down on the number of clamps you *need* to have in your shop, and speed up multiple-stage glue-ups quite a bit. I'd keep one, and sell the other, myself. If you sell them both, you might kick yourself later! The only other advice he had was that it was a good idea to wear gloves and a respirator when using that urea glue, since it contains formaldehyde- but white and yellow glue are supposed to work with it as well.

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On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 10:23:06 +0000, Ron Moore wrote:

Folks, now here's the story 'bout Ronnie the Moocher, He was an Old Arn hootchie-cootcher, He cleaned a shop out of all of its stuff, And loaded it into the back of his truck.
Ho-de-ho-de-ho-de-ho! (Ho-de-ho-de-ho-de-ho)
Ohmigod do you blow! (Yes, you certainly do blow)
He-de-he-de-he-de-yuck! (He-de-he-de-he-de-yuck)
And at the same time You Suck! (Yes, you definitely suck) </Cab Calloway>
Have a nice day.
--
Joe Wells


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