Furniture Finish Question


I purchased a 5 - gallon bucket of oil-based poly to refinish my floors. Can I use the extra for finishing furniture? I was thinking about finishing the inside of my kitchen cabinets with an equal mix of poly - BLO - turpentine. Cabinet guts made from maple ply and face fames are cherry. Any thoughts?
Thanks.
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Jack says...

BLO and turpentine both stink in a major way.
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And poly doesn't?

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CW says...

It does, but he has to use something for the finish, and he can do it without the BLO and turpentine. If it was me, I would probably just use shellac and only go to varnish later if it proved inadequate.
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On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 17:15:03 +0000, Jack wrote:

Thoughts, yes. Useful ones, well... Why mix those three things? They each have a place, but why mix? I could see putting poly over the BLO. Not my cuppa, but it seems ok to do. The turps will just make your rice taste funny.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Go for it.
I'd personally go 40-20-40, poly-oil-spirits.
Barry
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Why? A little turp will thin it if it it too thick; but why oil? The maple won't absorb much of it; it will just give a thinner and slower drying finish.
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Yes you can use it. That's what I used for my workbench. It's a quick easy thin film finish.
However.... A kitchen is a high-use area. I would use something more full-strength for external and contact areas.
But the workbench... yes, it's a high use area, but it gets regular wax and I intend to shave down the surface to level it from time to time.... not something I intend to do with my kitchen cabs.
-steve

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Of course poly euethane is one of the toughest coatings. I can stand up to some of the most common household detergents. It is one of the best for furniture. But the traditional laquers are nice too. Eurethane is a good coating for furniture that is going to get a beating like a kitchen table for example or wooden counter top.

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