Framing Nailer recommendation

Need a recommendation for a framing nailer or a link to a review (if any one knows of one).. Initial use will be a fence project, followed by an outdoor shed.
Don't need state of the art, just a mid-road model that I can easily get nails for and is safe and useable for a non-Pro.
Also, round or clipped head? Difference or adv/disadvantage with respect to the projects listed above.
I recently purchased a Senco Finish Pro 18 brad nailer... Excellent model..... something on those lines in terms of fit and finish.
Thanks !!
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I have four Bostich framers and two Sencos. The Bostich nailers seem to hold up good and are easy to rebuild if needed for about $30.00. We build log homes and do alot or remodeling and use them everyday so they take alot of abuse. I have dropped them 3 stories, I actually ran over one with my ton truck and many more horrible things and they just keep on working. Main thing is keep the oil in them. Dont be afaid of over oiling them, it wont hurt them a bit. At least it hasnt mine. Nails are sold practically anywhere for them and they do use the clip head which is fine for framing and plywood/OSB sheathing. The Sencos I havent had for long and honestly I dont use them much. I got them in a horse swap from a guy and for some reason I still find myself reaching for the Bostich out of habit I guess. They work ok though and dont have any problems that I can tell yet.
Jim

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Most framers will do the shed just fine. If the fence project involves attaching pickets to rails, few framers shoot a nail short enough to avoid penetrating beyond the horizontal stringer. Fence nails are usually 1-3/4" or 1-7/8" in length and applied with a coil nailer such as the Hitachi NV65AH. My framer is the Hitachi NR83A (20 degree round head). Hitachi also makes the NR83AA (31 degree clipped head) which is the same nail used by the Paslode framers.
Pick the nails you want to shoot which are most economical and available. Then get a nailer which will use them.

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Nonsense. The picketts we use on decks and such come in at about 1 1/8" and if you're using a 2 by for the rails you have another 1 1/2 which gives you at least 2 5/8, more if the wood is still dripping from being treated which is often the case. 8d nails for the Bostich are shorter than that already and if you angle the gun just slighty you have even more. I've done this plenty of times and my nails never show through. A better alternative is to use screws for the picketts in the first place which works a whole lot better and the inspectors will love you for it. Code around here actually calls for 2 nails top and bottom if you're nailing but only one screw if you go that route.
Jim
wrote:

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I bought a used cordless Passlode from HD when building my shed. Have used multiple sizes of nails, and except when nailing cedar, I've had no problems. Cedar is so soft, and you can't really adjust the Passlode to "just" set the nail. But for doing a fence, deck or shed, you can't beat having the cordless. And by buying the used one from the HD rental dept, I saved a fair bit of $$. I am happy with my purchase and would buy this framing nailer again.
Dave
On 1/11/04 10:19, in article sIeMb.24313$5V2.36330@attbi_s53, "cp"

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