Framing nail recommendations

I just ordered a Paslode cordless framing nailer. Now I'm looking at all the choices there are for nails . . .
A friend has the same nailer, and says he uses the 2-3/8 ring nails for just about everything. I'm looking to do fairly general stuff in the short term (shelves, etc.), and build a garage next spring.
I will probably be using mostly rough cut hemlock 2x's & pine 1x's, so I expect I'll need some of the longer 3-1/4 nails for framing. I'd love to get a selection, but can't seem to find nails in smaller quantities, and don't want to buy large quantities of nails I may not use.
What do people seem to find the most versatile for size & finish, and should I stick with the Paslode, or are the Grip-Rite and other brands OK to use?
Thanx Don
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Power nailers are typically used for projects requiring many nails. Boxes of 2,000 are typically the smallest ones. Boxes of 4,000-5,000 are typical of framing nails. If you want variety, get a framing hammer and several 1# boxes of nails. For framing, 3" bright nails are typically used. Since they are countersunk, that will completely join 2x material without a sharp point protruding on the other side.
On 10 Sep 2004 00:04:57 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Don97623) wrote:

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I get most nails at Lowes/HD, third party brands when possible, but have mail ordered some and bought some at the contractor stores. Never bought less than the boxes for $30-40. I'm not sure I've ever seen fewer.
Ring nails are far more resistant to pulling and I use them most everywhere, just a few bucks extra. 2 3/8 is good, but 2" is fine for sheathing and gussets made of thin ply. You can do siding, if you can control the drive depth accurately. My Bostitch does not do a good job on depth control...gotta look at it.
For roughcut, you need all the nail and holding you can get. 3 1/4" barely does it in my opinion. I overdrive, to sink them and get a little more penetration. I built my house from full 2X framing...used several cases!
Wilson

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Use 3+" bright for framing, 2 3/8" ring or twistie for fastening sheathing (ply or osb) to framing. Galvanized for exterior applications. You'll find these fasteners are the most common used in home building. -dave

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Lucky me! Today on my way to HD to price out the nails, I just happened to swing into a yard sale, at which I found a full box (5000) plus a partial of 2-3/8 ring nails, and about half a box of 3-1/4 bright. All for $30 - less than half what I would have paid at the store, I think. They're Senco brand, but labelled to fit the Paslode IMCT - will just half to break the sticks in half, as these are 60 to a strip, and the Paslode supposedly takes 44 max. Just checked - the gun supposedly shipped from Fry's on Thursday, so hopefully I'll have it to use this week! New toys are so much fun!
Don

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Don, See http://www.paslode.com/products/tool_catalog/IMCT.html This tool takes 30 degree paper collated clipped-head nails. There are some recommendations as well: - Not recommended for 3" or 3-1/4" nails in pressure-treated lumber. - Not recommended above 5000 feet elevation or below 20 degrees F. - The nailer must be dis-assembled and cleaned periodically depending on the number of nails driven and the amount of dust in the air. Extra O-rings and a few spare parts are advisable.
On 10 Sep 2004 00:04:57 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Don97623) wrote:

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