Forstner bits for oak worktops?


Hi Folks New to the group. I need to drill two holes about 5/8" diam. for some kitchen taps to fit them to 44mm solid oak worktops and have been advised to use `forstner bits` for this job and wondered if group members would rindeed ecommend these or any other way of doing it please. Thanks Steve
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Do these need to be clean? If not, use a spade bit. Forstner bits are tough to use with an electric hand drill as a drill press would be better.
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Thanks for the quick reply Leon. The holes will actually be hidden by the flange on the tap base. I did think about speed or spade bits and wondered if the oak would be too tough for them?. Cheers Steve
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Steve you could probably buy 3 or 4 spade bits for 1/2" the price of a Forstner bit. If the hole is not critical and will not show I would go with the spade. In an electric hand drill the Spade would probably cut faster than a Forstner bit. Basically Frostier bits will drill very clean and flat bottomed holes. If you burn a spade bit up you may only be out a dollar or 2.
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Brace (sp?) and bit. Jim

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Brace (sp?) and bit. Jim
Definitely my favorite idea.
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AAvK wrote:

Easily the best choice. At least to start the hole and have a clean edge.
Don't know why everyone is afraid of hand tools. Even with a large hole, e.g., 2-1/8, for locks, you cab use one of those adjustable bits. Seems that few people remember when electricity wasn't always available and of course battery operated drills weren't available. Same for hand saws.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

It is for a faucet and so might be up against the wall, in which case an ordinary brace's swing could be blocked by a wall...
Maybe an eggbeater? :)
er
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Enoch Root wrote:

Most braces have ratchets.
An eggbeater drill is fine for small holes, but not so hot for larger ones.
John Martin
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That's what the ratchet is for.

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Steve wrote:
> New to the group. I need to drill two holes about 5/8" diam. for some > kitchen taps to fit them to 44mm solid oak worktops and have been > advised to use `forstner bits` for this job and wondered if group > members would rindeed ecommend these or any other way of doing it > please.
Forstner bits do a great job if you need a clean hole; however, very difficult to use with a hand drill.
I'd probably use a hole saw with a hand drill which will also provide a clean hole.
From memory, 5/8" is the minimum hole saw size.
If you are willing to accept a garbage job, then think spade bit.
Lew
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in

I'm not a pro but I agree with everybody who said a forstner bit doesn't seem like the right choice. They're only 5/8 holes. Seems to me you could get nice clean hole with an auger or brad point, or even a plain ol' normal bit, long as you're careful and don't go too fast. Spade bit would be my last choice. For some reason I just don't like using spade bits.
Forstner would work fine but you got to kinda "coax" it along with a hand drill and unless you need a short hole with a flat bottom I don't know as I'd worry about it.
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<<<For some reason I just don't like using spade bits.>>>
My reason is that I prefer my wrist in its current unfractured state.
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Are you referring to bore bits?
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I don't know what that is but I was referring to standard spade bits.
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On Sun, 26 Feb 2006 15:30:48 -0800, Steve wrote:

Skip the Forstner bit.
Drill a 1/4" hole all the way through with whatever style of drill you already own. Make the diameter larger by drilling from both sides with a standard 5/8" twist drill.
OR
Pick any drill bit you own that is approximately the same size as the web (the straight across part that joins the two cutting lips) of the 5/8" drill you plan to use. Drill all the way through to mark the location from both sides.
Since you are probably using a hand drill, don't make the pilot hole too big or you'll have trouble with the 5/8" drill wanting to grab the sides and make an UGLY hole. And a bruise or two.
Bill
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