Finish problem..BLO and spar varnish

For reasons to match existing color edge grained Fir in our house I want to first "color" our custom made 40" fir front entrance door with boiled linseed oil to get to the color i want and then put multiple coats of marine grade spar varnish for protection. Is there a compatability issue? I'm in the Northwest so the spar varnish is really a neccesity. Thanks
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Either wipe the BLO very thin, or make sure that it's had several days to cure. I wouldn't try to do oil then spar in the same day under any circumstance. But that's me.
Spar is a good finish, and great for an outdoor piece. I've wiped it on successfully, cutting it with maybe 30% VMP Naptha. That, I can get two coats on in a normal day. Which is good, because you're going to want at least 4 coats, and maybe 6 or eight. Note that the spar will give you some coloring, ambering, too, so calculate that into your process. And the Doug fir will darken nicely with exposure to light.
BTW, you should likely ignore the part on the varnish can about 'do not thin'. My limited experience tells me that's to satisfy the regulators about the VOCs and the like. Unthinned, the application is much more work, and you're going to use that much thinner in cleaning your brushes. The naptha makes it dry/cure more quickly, and the old rag used gets dried and disposed of when you're finished.
Enjoy.
Patriarch
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One of my basic finishes is BLO and spar, mixed and thinned. Haven't had a problem in ten years, and it only looks better as it ages. You'll probably want to let the BLO cure for a week if you're applying varnish as a top coat, just to give the varnish a dry footing. I suspect the dryers in the varnish will help any remaining uncured oil to cure.
Spar gives you a high gloss, and since it's a high oil percentage varnish, it moves with the wood instead of cracking, unlike a brittle furniture-grade short oil phenolic. Sounds like the right choice.
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What's the procedure for after the final coat? I've been lightly sanding with 400 grit between coats to clear off any nubs ect. Steel wool and wax? Wax alone? Want it as smooth as a babies b......

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Absolutely wait a month before doing anything to the top coat. Varnishes cure slowly. Rubbing out too early can tear through.
4-0 steel wool and wax will bring up a nice satin sheen. Applying an extra coat of varnish will give insurance against cutting through.
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Wax alone? Want it as smooth as a babies b...... SNIP
Mc . . . For on-deck 'brightwork' the typical norm is 6 coats . . . at LEAST. MY methodology is to use a 'short oil' varnish and start between coat sanding with 220 {for the first two coats, which are thinned 50 percent and 25 percent, respectively}, then 320, 400, 600. Then Rubbing Compound, and a couple of coats of a good wax.
It's the same procedure I use on Joanne's Maple topped kitchen cabinet. I did the same over stain for the window shelf - only with 3 coats of Clear poly, with 320, 400, & 600.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
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