Favorite clamps and where to buy, please.

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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote in

I'm with you on the quick clamps - useful for a third hand when getting everything situated, but not capable of actually clamping. FWIW, I like the Jorgensen "EZ HOLD" in that style, but I don't think they've made them in 20 years.

He means the pipe clamps that use black iron pipe. Pony is the common brand.

I have no use for the aluminum bar clamps. Too weak. Plus, as dadi said, the head doesn't engage the bar well (I have some Record clamps which are steel, with the same problem. In general you want to check the bar on a bar clamp for well cut grooves for the ratchet to engage - I think that's the biggest difference between good bar clamps and bad ones).

My rule of thumb is if the bar is bending significantly (a little bend is OK) it's time to get out the pipe clamps or the K-bodies. Or figure out what's gone wrong that I'm needing so much clamp pressure :-)
John
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On Sat, 20 Sep 2014 20:07:06 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Irwin makes some "heavy duty" Quick Clamps that can provide quite a bit of force but the jaws don't remain parallel as well as 'K' style clamps. I really like the Besseys.
http://www.irwin.com/tools/clamps/xp600-one-handed-bar-clamps-spreaders
"Provides 600 lbs of one-handed force"

Ah, yes. I got rid of my pipe clamps years ago. Too heavy and the jaws weren't big enough. Black pipe used to be cheap but not so much any more.

I never had problems with the head engaging, rather the head snapped. ...a lot of 'em.

The point is that the pressure needed to start the bar twisting is pretty small. The bar is too thin, so tends to twist.
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Yeah, those are what I have, some 12", some 24". I use them for pretty much anything they will fit, have found them plenty strong enough. For bigger stuff, I use 1/2" ot 3/4" pipe clamps...I can and have hooked them together to clamp 10' stuff. Or bigger, if need be.
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Twist or bend? Yes, they do bend. So?
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On 9/20/14, 4:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I just bought some of those on sale and let me tell you, they are AWESOME!
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On Saturday, September 20, 2014 5:44:52 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

f force but the jaws don't remain parallel as well as 'K' style > clamps. I really like the Besseys. > > http://www.irwin.com/tools/clamps/xp600-one-h anded-bar-clamps-spreaders > > "Provides 600 lbs of one-handed force" > I j ust bought some of those on sale and let me tell you, they are AWESOME!
I'm not crazy about any of this style of clamp, though, at times, I use the m for a third hand, when prepping for further clamping.
I most often use pony clamps and bar clamps (like these heavy duty bar clam ps - https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/14704971100/in/photostream ) .
Some time ago, a retired woodworker sold his inventory and I bought 73 of h is American made pony clamps (pipe included) for $3 each. He had at least 150 remaining to be sold. Wish I had bought more, but at the time, I didn' t have any more cash in my pocket.
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On Sat, 20 Sep 2014 18:51:48 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

Ouch!
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On 9/20/14, 5:51 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

NICE!
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-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

I compared 2 similar looking clamps. One's with plastic parts in the guts, and one with metal parts there. And just as I expected, the one that had metal one. I made a mental note at the point to remember to always look for the metal.
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Bill wrote:

OOPs, that should be, "the one that had metal WON".

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On 9/19/2014 11:25 AM, tomwalz wrote:

and if you need wooden hand screw clamps, heare is a good deal on Bessey.
http://www.woodpeck.com/bessey10whc.html
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote in wrote:

To be clear, I was thinking of the steel bar Jorgensen clamps, which are exerting a fair bit of force by the time they're bending.
Generally in cabinetry, if you need a lot of clamp force then something isn't right. Maybe if you're doing bent laminations, or building a boat or something like that; but most things we do should go together with only moderate pressure. Even for edge-gluing panels, 5 small clamps works better than 3 big ones widely spaced.
John
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Tom,

I started out with 3/4" Pony bar clamps with 48" black pipe. They were fairly inexpensive and have a lot of clamping force. But, they tend to tip over when trying to glue up panels, and the black pipe leaves black stains at the glue joints (not usually a problem since I plane the panels down after glueup).
Based on Mark's review on the Wood Whisperer, I invested in a set of Jet 24" parallel bar clamps.
http://tinyurl.com/ke6aotj
I've really liked the Jet bar clamps. The 24" length is perfect for most projects I work on. They stand up nicely during glueups, and the trigger latch makes it easy to adjust the moveable head.
My wife bought me a Bessey brand parallel clamp many years ago and I could never get the head to work right. I don't know if it's me or something wrong with the clamp, but I never liked it. The trigger on the Jet clamp is much easier to work with.
I also have a small collection of 12" Irwin bar clamps:
http://tinyurl.com/k36teg2
I bought four to start with, then bought another four a year or two later. Unfortunately, the newer clamps have smaller clamping heads than the old clamps, but they still work nice.
The Irwin clamps work great for gluing up laminations or other small projects. I actually use them a lot for clamping things to my saw horses when working on projects.
I don't use the pipe clamps much anymore, but they're still handy when I need the longer 48" length. They're also easier to gang up for really long lengths as I can rotate the heads on the pipes to engage another clamp. I also used the pipe clamps when building out house to help pull things into alignment. The high clamping pressure helped in those situations.
I don't have any of the one handed clamps at the moment, but there are times those would really come in handy.
Hope this helps,
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On 9/21/14, 8:28 AM, Leon wrote:

WoW, that is a great deal! Wish I was in the market right now.
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On 9/21/14, 9:52 AM, Sonny wrote:

That's *exactly" what I use them for, mostly, as a third hand.
I building a Sharn* in own new back yard, by myself, and those new Irwins came in real handy when lifting 16' treated 2x10s into place onto the posts to make the laminated beam for the trusses.
(*too big for a shed, too small for a barn)
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Most of mine have galvanized rather than black pipe but would leave stain too if I'm using yellow glue (because of the acid in the glue) if they were touching the glue line. Which they aren't.
When I first put a pipe clamp on, I assure that the clamp pressure points are centered on the board edges as much as possible and rotate the clamp so the pipe is touching the board which lets me see if the boards are buckling. Once all is well, I rotate the clamp so the pipe is no longer touching the wood. No stains.

Or - if both ends of the pipe are threaded - just join one or more lengths of pipe with pipe couplings.
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Something to try (and cheap) - get a couple SS pipe clamps and put them on the pipe loose (so that they slide easy). Position them so they contact the wood instead of the black or galvanized pipe.
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wrote:

The pipe clamps I had wouldn't work with galvanized pipe. The jaws wouldn't bite through the surface, so couldn't be tightened. I was also warned that if they did, the galvanization would flake off making a mess.

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I'm a strong beleiver in the idea that you can't have too many clamps, but I'm having a mighty hard time thinking of a use for 220 pipe clamps.
John
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On Sunday, September 21, 2014 7:12:44 PM UTC-5, John McCoy wrote:

LOL, yeah. The guy was in the cabinet business, so he would probably need that many. His shop was large, lots of big iron, also, so he likely had ot her workers.... multiple jobs at a time. His clamp inventory had 4' length s to 12' lengths. I got mostly 4' & 6' lengths, a few 10' lengths.
As for as ones I bought, I had given some to 2 family members, for 1) when I go to my sister's house to do work/tasks, seems I often/always need clamp s and didn't have any, there, and 2) a nephew is a promising woodworker who needed more clamps. Wish I had gotten more to give more to him. He may e nd up getting most of my stock/tools/etc., anyway.
Sonny
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