Face jointing--who does it?

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No. Joint one side, then *plane* the other. *After* you're finished jointing.

You have the right idea, but I think you've misunderstood the process for getting there. You're right that wood should be removed in approximately equal amounts from each face, and for exactly the reason that you stated.
The purpose of face jointing is to make one face straight and flat. You *cannot* make the second face straight, flat, *and* parallel to the first one with a jointer. That's what a thickness planer does.
Trying to do that with a jointer is pointless at best. At worst, you may ruin the board by tapering it too much.
So joint one face until it's flat. Then thickness-plane the opposite face until you've removed about the same amount of material. *Then* start alternating faces (by flipping the board end-for-end) as you continue to plane the board to final thickness.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Feb 17, 5:06�pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Doug, Thanks a lot, that makes a lot of sense. Cliff
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You're welcome. I should add one more thing to clarify: thickness-plane the opposite face until you've removed about the same amount of material, *and* that face is straight and flat along its entire length. *Then* start alternating faces, etc. etc.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@champlaintelephone.com says...

It implies no such thing. S2S or S3S lumber has been *planed* on both faces. It has *not* been jointed.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Okay Doug ... now you got me confused. Just exactly -what- was done to the 3rd face in S3S?
Bill
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often done on the same machine while planing, so straight ahead is pretty much determined by the feed, not the fence. Edge saws probably make a straighter edge, at least initially, until the board begins to dry.
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Depends on what you mean by the "third face". :-)
S3S lumber has been: 1) planed on one face 2) flipped over and planed on the other face 3) straight-line ripped on one edge.
Stop after step 2 and it's S2S.
At *no* point is a jointer involved.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Think about it. Why attempt to straiten something that's already strait?

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Why don't you just put your jointer on e-bay right now?
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Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wrong order. Face joint first, then edge joint.

you're satisfied with "pretty straight", then don't bother.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

I'm pretty sure you're not selecting straight lumber. And even if it looks straight at the store, it's not going to be straight in your shop. For table tops, I always buy rough stock and face joint it so I know it's as flat as I can get it, and usually in two steps in case there's internal tension. I.e. face it mostly, plane it mostly, let it rest. Then face it the rest of the way, thickness it, and use it.
For reference, the sequence is: face joint, thickness plane, edge joint, rip to width. Don't edge first.
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You outline the standard approach nicely. The only tidbit is that, depending on wood species, it may be advisable to wait between the two passes -- it does help with the internal stresses but it also takes a while to get the humidity re-balanced. For table tops it really helps if the wood can sit in the conditions to which the final piece will be exposed. Taking the first face-joint pass off speeds the aclimatization. I have an uncle who has for many (30+) years sworn by keeping a small stickered pile of wood under his bed for just such uses. Such behavior may be correlated with his divorces.
hex -30-
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