Face jointing--who does it?

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I was recently talking to a gentleman who teaches woodworking classes about face jointing, and he said that he hardly ever does it. He said if he were making a dining room table or something similar, he would face joint, but otherwise, he simply edge joints.
The lumber I typically use is 13/16" kiln dried random width cherry. The place where he works sells the same wood, so I'm assuming he's using what I'm using.
I recently built a shaker style sofa table, and I edge jointed, face jointed one side, and then planed it to a uniform thickness.
Can I omit the face jointing if I'm selecting pretty straight lumber?
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That depends upon your definition of "pretty straight" and whether it suits the needs of your project ... if you don't need to, don't.
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On 16 Feb 2007 06:57:59 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If it doesn't need it, sure. I usually run lumber for lamination glue-ups through the planer just to ensure they're all the same thickness. That's usually enough to remove any cupping as well.
------------------------------------------=o&>o---- Steve Manes, Brooklyn, USA www.magpie.com
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For the record, I do, but I use mostly rough-cut stock.

You should really face, then edge joint to ensure that ht edge is at 90 degrees to the face. The reverse does not work because the edge is not a big enough reference surface

probably... it depends.
What's the big deal? You're already at the jointer. If it's a close to straight board, it will take only 2 or 3 passes to go from rough to reference surface which will probably save you a pass at the planer.
Having reread the original post, you are using 13/16 stock.... that suggests S2S or S3S stock. That implies that it already has been face jointed by your supplier. Has the wood moved since then? Maybe; probably not much.
-Steve
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On Feb 16, 10:00 am, "Stephen M"

Thanks for the replies as well as the pointers about the order of jointing.
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On Feb 16, 4:00 pm, "Stephen M"

oh boy... JP
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On Feb 16, 11:00?am, "Stephen M"

When you are taking 2 or 3 passes on the jointer, do you alternate cuts? Joint 1 side, flip the boaard over, and joint other side. I read that this should be done so the wood dries out evenly, and less likly to twist, cup, etc. What say about this? I have a lot to learn, and have learned much from this group. Thanks to all.
Cliff
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wrote:

One face is good. You'll be equalizing the passes on the other side when you get to the planer. Good lumber doesn't normally get more than a look, and to the planer stack. Glueups don't require the same straight stock that door frames do. Where it counts, face for a reference and go to the planer.
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"sailor" wrote in message

In order for a jointer to be used properly you need to use it in conjunction with a planer unless you have a very specific reason for doing otherwise, and only then with a good deal of care and experience, and on a well setup machine.
To properly "dimension" the stock (thickness in the case of jointing a face), do not joint both faces.
If you try to joint both faces, it is _highly_ likely that you will introduce a *taper* into your stock, and it will likely get worse the more passes you make.
The best way, particularly for the inexperienced, is to "Joint" one face flat, then flip it and "Plane" the opposite face parallel to the now flat, newly "jointed" face.
The jointer and planer, used together in the proper order, will insure that your stock is of even thickness and the faces are parallel throughout its length and width.
To do otherwise is best left to very experienced hands and special circumstances.
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Not sure exactly what you mean by "to do otherwise". I don't have a jointer, for a combination of space and financial reasons, but have used rough stock plenty of times in the past. I'm just as careful as I can be about buying rough stock that is as flat as I can get it, and it generally comes out fine using only the planer.
If something is *really* warped, then I hand plane it first. I might get a jointer someday, but it's not high on the list of priorities. It's a machine that is fairly simple to work around, and not strictly necessary for all but the "very experienced".
That being said, if I ever happen to run across a large amount of rough-cut lumber for the right price, I am positive I'll change my tune pretty quickly. For now, buying S3S makes the jointer a little redundant.
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I have the same reasons. To get the cheapest 6" jointer, it will cost me about $2000 and many hours of labor.
For the most part, I'm able to buy wood that I can go right to the planer, or I have it jointed when I buy it. OTOH, I've seen some lower priced wood that has been air dried but would take a bit of fiddling around to use without a jointer.
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wrote:

Huh? My 6" portable Delta does fine within the limits of its table size and if worse comes to worse it can be stood on end in a corner. If you can't get a jointer into your shop then I'm surprised that you can get a surface large enough to be able to use a jointer plane into it.

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wrote in message

I don't want the portable if I do get one. There is no practical room for a stand model until I build a shed. As for using a jointer plane, that is what the bench is for.
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a strait edge. It is a prep machine for other machines. That's it. Never could see owning one myself for as little as it does.
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"CW" wrote in message

As mean a SOB as you are, I'd sworn you had one just to shave with!
;)
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That's what the drawknife is for. :)

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Ah, now I get it. You go straight from the TS to glue up, not by choice, but because you don't own a jointer!! LOL
New rule: You can't give advice on the use of a tool if you have never owned said tool.
The jointer is far from "a prep machine for other machines". I find it indispensable in my shop.
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I don't own a machine shop either but I can, and do, turn out work that would make Lie-Neilson jealous. I don't own a jointer because I don't need one.
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Not the sole purpose- they can also rabbet edges, but so can other tools.

That's not terribly funny. It says more about your table saw use than CW's lack of a jointer, really. It's also ignoring the two major workarounds for edge jointing that anyone with a table saw or a router table can use. If you know those, it's not that tough to edge joint with a blade or straight bit- and it then *is* a matter of choice to either go straight from the saw to glue-up or to joint the edges first. It's a matter of confidence in your ability to accurately cut the material the first time. If you need to cut oversize then sneak up on the final dimension, there is nothing inherantly wrong with that- but it certainly does not give you an elevated place to stand where you can laugh at others.

Sure you can. Anyone who has worked in a wood shop, or even a decent construction outfit, is bound to have used more than a few tools they don't personally own. I've used a number of panel saws, for instance- but I couldn't justify the cost to buy one for at home. You can believe it or not, and I don't care which- but every shop I've worked in has had a jointer.... on a mobile base, and shoved into the corner where it sits untouched for years at a time. Don't get me wrong, they have their uses- but they're not as indispensible as you make them out to be.

Weren't you the guy using precision measurement tools to set up your saw? You should have a glue ready cut easily using a rig like that. No need to fix perfect, right?
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You must have missed the other 'jointer' thread where CW was busting on my 'inability' to go from the TS to glue up without first jointing.

I use mine on 'every' project. Before I bought one, sure I got by without it! Now, I can't see how I got by without it.

I like to lightly joint after ripping. So do 'many' others.
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