Equipping a wood workshop


I've always puttered around in my father's workshop and finally have an area of my own in which I can build a workshop. The first thing I need is to get the right tools.
I have fine handtools and am looking for equally good power tools. I have a really nice Makita miter saw.
Here's the list of tools I'm looking to buy. I'd appreciate any comments or suggestions regarding the list.
Table saw - Grizzly G0444 Router - Bosch 1617EVS Scroll saw - Either a Dewalt DW788 20" or a Delta 40-570R 16" Belt/Disc Sander - Wilton 99175 4"x36"/9" or the Craftsman 21536 4"x36"/9"
I plan on mounting the router to an extension table to the table saw. The Scroll saw would sit on its own bench, lined up with another work bench.
The list above comes from reading various reviews and checking out various specs. But of course, hearing from regular wood-nuts would be far more valuable to me.
Thanks!
Jack
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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:
<snip>

I think I'd spend the extra $80 for the cast iron wings and opt for the G0444Z.

A decent router. The 2.25 HP should handle most use.

The DeWalt DW788 would be my choice.

I have a 6" x 48" / 9" belt/disk sander that seldom gets used. Unless you have a specific need I wouldn't be in a hurry to purchase this item.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Whaddyawanna build? For some things, a bandsaw, lathe, or jointer/planer might be more useful than the last two items on your list.
Clint
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

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Ah, good point. Forgot to say what I'd be using the workshop for! LOL
Well, I think I'm more interested in making puzzles, boxes, maybe some intarsia ... fun stuff like that. I don't think I'd ever get into using a lathe (though my father certainly loved it). I don't think I'll get into cabinet making or something like that either, but who knows?
The two items that interest me the most are working with the scroll saw and the router. Over time, if I get good at using these, I'll probably find myself needing better equipment. For now, I set my sights on mid-range items.
Jack
Clint wrote:

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On 2005/8/14 3:59 PM, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

Given that you have a miter saw, I would suggest a band saw instead of the table saw.
Also, I would go with an oscillating belt/spindle sander rather than the disk/belt combination.
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 13:59:44 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

Yeah, stay away from lathes. They take over your whole shop, and cover everything in spiral shavings and cause you to eye up every wood pile in the neighborhood with sheer letchery. Nasty things, those... :)
For what you've got listed, you might want to consider a thickness planer and a small bandsaw as well. My wife does some scroll sawing, and most of the use my planer gets is thinning 4/4 stock for her projects, as thinner stock is often hard to find. The bandsaw, when small, is handy for cutting the outline of your projects for the scroll saw (I've found it's a lot quicker and easier than a scroll saw, myself- it just can't do interior cuts) and when larger, is good for resawing standard lumber before running it through the aforementioned planer so you have two finished boards instead of one and a big pile of mulch!

The mid-range you've got listed is a very good start- you may find that they're all you need for the long haul. Just stay away from the really little stuff- it can do good work if you're careful, but you'll want to upgrade right away.
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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

The choices look OK. Do you have specific projects in mind? The reason I ask is the tools you will buy. Thee are people that make a hobby of just scroll sawing. I've yet to buy one myself. I do have a bandsaw though. I use my belt sander a lot. Great for final finishing a dimension or curved piece. In short order, consider a drill press too. Let your projects help guide the sequence of tools to acquire.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Oops! Forgot all about a drill press. Do you have any recommendations? I'd probably never need a monster type, just something for smaller work. Being able to do some fine-detailed drilling would be nice too.
Jack
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

I've very happy with my 12" Delta (about $200) I since built and auxiliary table for it with stops and fence. .The table has a crank to raise and lower it. Some small cheap ones do not and would be a PITA to use.
You mentioned intarsia in another post. You may find something like the Ridgid belt/orbital sander to be a good choice for your needs.
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 14:00:55 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

Ah. Drill presses, IMO are one of the few tools that you can get by on the cheap side with. I've got a little "Tool Shop" one the wife got me- I groaned inwardly when I opened it up, but it has been plugging along for quite a while, and has had absolutely no problems. Just get whatever looks good to you- but don't skimp on the bits!
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The Delta 11-950 bench drill press I bought has a pin that I thought would secure the table at 90. How wrong I was! It flops back and forth so much that I put blocks underneath to secure it for particular holes. Guess I expected too much for the $135 in 1992.
On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 20:59:25 -0500, Prometheus

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nospambob wrote:

I have one of the Cheap Tool Road Show type Drill presses. I have had it for at least 12 years and it is still going and gets frequent use. I have replaced the belt once on it. The original was nothing more than cords when it came apart last year. It is a table top version with about 8 inches of working area under the bit and the table all the way down. I have thought about replacing the shaft with a longer piece of pipe of equal diameter.
One funny thing that has happened to my drill press, I was going to do some drilling once and it had been a few months since touching the drill. I started to run the bit down and was met with a great resistance. The bit would not return to its up most position either. So, I started taking the press apart. What I found to be the problem was large amounts of Rat Poison pellets stored inside the workings of the press around the gears for the arbor shaft. Seems that the rats could climb up the shaft from the opening at the bottom up to the top which just happen to open right up in the gear area. Cleaned out the gears and stuff and lubed everything up again and all was well.
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"mywebaccts wrote in message

Nope ... the first thing you need to do is figure out where your interests lay in woodworking, then buy those tools that will help you accomplish that interest, as you need them.
Examples: A cabinet shop _needs_ a table saw, many furniture makers get buy with a bandsaw; many wooddorkers don't own a scrollsaw and basically have very little use for one ... in short, there are tools in just about any shop, purchased on a perceived need instead of an actual need, that never get used.
You've already gotten an excellent indication of the underlying wisdom of this with the reply on the questionable need for a disc sander.
--
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Last update: 8/07/05
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Have to agree with this one- lots of people could care less about having a belt/disc sander, but I use mine all the time- more than the drill press, certainly. Works great for smoothing curved table legs, but I don't know how useful it'd be for a scroll sawyer.
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*snip*

Chances are a rotary sander with small drums would be better for a scroll sawer. While they're harder to get a smooth, even surface with, they'll get into areas any other power sander wouldn't hope to fit in.
Puckdropper
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Maybe you've already covered this, but the most handy tool I have is my bench.
It is wonderful to have a 6' space that is sturdy and flat and will hold still when I plane, drill, etc on it. That and the vice make a real difference.
Walt Cheever
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