Electrical connection from ceiling

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What is the best way to make an electrical connection froma ceiling mounted outlet to machinery that is located in the center of a shop? I have a large planer that is going into the center of my shop and need to run power to it from above. There is a metal beam 11 feet from the floor in the area and I've attached a piece of unistrut to this beam to extend over the planer.
I'm thinking of a whip and a "chinese finger" or some such, but I'm not sure what they're officially called. I've googled and looked at the grainger catalog, but haven't found what I'm looking for yet.
Thanks Mike
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Mike Dembroge wrote:

I you can't feasibly supply power under floor, I use the hanging locking plug and let the socket hang from the ceiling above head height, so if there is reason to disconnect and move the equipment can walk upright w/o dodging or running into it.
Something like Leviton 2320/2321 is 20A version, they're also available in 30A if needed...
--
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Thanks for the info. I'll look up what Leviton has. My planer draws 38 amps, so this is on a 50-amp circuit which I'm hoping won't make it more difficult to find.
Thanks again,
Mike

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Mike Dembroge wrote:
> Thanks for the info. I'll look up what Leviton has. My planer draws 38 > amps, so this is on a 50-amp circuit which I'm hoping won't make it more > difficult to find.
Is that at 120V or 240V?
Lew
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220v.

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Mike Dembroge wrote:

That inrush or nameplate?
If latter, thassa' 10 hp or maybe even greater.
I'm intrigued, what's the planer?
Lot bigger than I was figuring, my "old iron" Model 13 is only 5 hp. In this case, better to go w/ something more on the lines of Lew's suggestion.
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I'm not familiar with the terms "inrush" or "nameplate". I've know what "peak"power is. Is that the same as "inrush"? The plate on the unit states "Total Amperage: 38". Is that what you mean by "nameplate" perhaps?

It's an Oliver 4455 planer with Shelix cutter head and has a 7.5hp motor.

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Mike Dembroge wrote:
> "Total Amperage: 38". Is that what you mean by "nameplate" perhaps? > > It's an Oliver 4455 planer with Shelix cutter head and has a 7.5hp motor.
I haven't got a code book handy, but a 2P-50A c'bkr is way TOO SMALL for a 7.5HP/38A motor.
You need at least a 60A, probably bigger, just to get past the inrush current.
Check the code.
Lew +
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I'm wondering on this planer w/ "Total Amperage" if there maybe are two or more motors...cutterhead being larger and drive/table as others. Don't know Oliver well enough by number to know for sure...
I'm w/ you, Lew, though, needs more thought methinks including perhaps as I noted before might even be worth converting this beastie (back?) to 3 ph w/ converter...
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Mike Dembroge wrote:
> "Total Amperage: 38". Is that what you mean by "nameplate" perhaps?
> It's an Oliver 4455 planer with Shelix cutter head and has a 7.5hp > motor.
Time to get serious.
Looked at the Oliver site.
Your machine is equipped with a 7-1/2HP, single phase motor and 38 FLA is quite reasonable.
You want to hard wire this piece of equipment, forget plug and receptacle.
You want a dedicated circuit coming from the panel.
If it was my shop, I'd invest in a magnetic motor starter for a 7-1/2HP motor complete with low voltage (120V) control.
Wiring in from an overhead drop is NBD, that's why SealTite was invented.
You need an industrial electrician, not some residential type contractor.
It's a piece of cake if you know what you're doing.
It will cost a few $, but then again, so did the planer.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I looked, too... :)
It has integral controls including motor start and emergency stop/reset. Undoubtedly for a unit this size they are magnetic.
Other than that, can't disagree a bit... :)
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I'll take a look at this option and talk to the electrician about. It's looking like it's a good thing they're making me go through him. He does commercial and is the guy that's been wiring up the entire building. he and his partner.

The machine has, what looks like, a standard magnetic starter embedded inside it. I did some poking around when it was delivered. I emailed Oliver to ask them what it's for, but haven't heard back yet. On your (and dpb's) advice, I'm going to email or call them about recommendations for wiring and connecting this to service.

"NBD"?
The guy, Harold, is a commercial guy, so I'm just going to do whatever he recommends.

...and the jointer...and the DC...and the DC duct work!!!
Thanks Lew.
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Mike Dembroge wrote: ...

I looked at the owners manual and I'm convinced it _is_ a standard starter and is internally wired to the control panel (p 5 iirc). You (or the electrician) make field connections to the feed side of it and you're all set to go.
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Mike Dembroge wrote:
> "NBD"?
As in No Big Deal<G>
Lew
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Yeah, I figured that out *after* I hit "Send"...doh!

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Mike Dembroge wrote:

...
"inrush" is the high starting current surge that can be multiples of the steady-state current draw.
"nameplate" is what the manufacturer placed on the motor/device as its requirements. Those are "real" values in the sense they are given specifically to allow for proper sizing of wiring/starters/etc.
"peak" I presume you mean is the bogus marketing claim of some homeowner class of products that is useless for anything other than dividing back down by to get at least an approximation of reality...
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On Jul 14, 6:45?pm, "Mike Dembroge"

Mike
While you are getting in an overhead box you might consider something to lower the 38 amps. Are you on 110 volts or 220?
Look on Ebay for your connector.
Bob AZ
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It's 220v, 1ph. I don't have 3ph in my shop space and that's not an option for me. The planer is an Oliver 4455 with a 7.5hp motor, so it's a beast (considering this is a move up from a dewalt bench-top model).
The electrical is a bit of a tricky issue and a bit of a long story. This is my first "pro" shop that I'm setting up. My shop space is an individual "storage unit" inside a huge wearhouse.
When I first spoke with my current landlord about renting shop space from him, he said that they supply a 100-amp panel in the space and put 110v outlets every 10 feet down the sides of the shop. They have 1ph only running to the building, and I was fine with that as long as I can put in 220v myself after I move in. After a few weeks, my landlord called me and said that they were running 220v in his shop next to mine and why doesn't he just run mine too as long as I show them where I want the outlets and how many.
So, we talked about where to put the 220v outlets and and everything seemed fine. That was, until I got a bill for $2,260. This is just to add four 220v circuits on top of the 110's that they were already adding. I was floored! I can't see how adding the 4 circuits could take more than a day, but I bit my tongue. I'm going to be here a long time and don't want to make waves I guess, so I never said anything and just ate the cost as a learning experience. The other kicker is that the 220v circuits are all 20-amp. When I ordered my planer, I neglected to realize how much more power it would need. Being my first shop, I knew I was going to overlook/screw-up something!
The reason this history is relevant is that my landlord is now saying that he doesn't want me to add the 50-amp circuit for my planer myself. he wants me to work with his electrician directly. I wonder how much this is going to cost?
I can sort of see his point, and while I'm no electrician, I have wired my own house and garage and have a dad who's a retired electrician. Plus, I'm real careful. If Im' not sure about something, I have no qualms about asking for help. I'm hoping I can come to a compromise and perhaps run all the EMT and wires myself and then have the elctrician hook it into the panel.
Mike

Very good idea. I'll check it out.

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Mike Dembroge wrote:

...snip rest of saga for brevity--in short dealing w/ commercial electrician instead of diy ...
Actually, this might be worth consideration of a single to 3-phase converter if this is intended to be commercial shop. In particular I can foresee additional equipment down the road if you're really going to be here a while...
Just a thought if you can take a couple of days to work this out and consider longer term...
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dpb wrote: ...

Well, on reflection... :)
First, I was thinking of this planer being "old iron" and not new, when it finally dawned on me the Shelix head obviously pretty-much disqualifies that... :)
Second, also on reflection, the 3PH would cut down the wiring required from the location of the converter to the motor/planer, but given the arrangement you outlined it might still require the long run of large capacity to supply it if you couldn't locate it near the service entrance.
I did go look at the Oliver Machinery site to see what I might learn, but the spec's published there aren't as complete as what you've provided, unfortunately, so still some question as to what the overall requirement really is, precisely.
I'd probably shoot off a request to them (Oliver). If it's an American-made motor (I don't know what Oliver is using these days and their spec's didn't say), you could also contact the manufacturer for clarification of the plate ratings. If the electrician is at all experienced in other than simply household wiring, he should be able to tell you what code requirements would/will be before making final decisions.
In just a quick lookup from my "Wiring Simplified", for a 7.5 hp motor recommends #6 Cu wire for a maximum distance of 110 ft (one way) for 2% voltage drop. Longer run would need large ampacity wire of course, and if use Al for cost, even larger.
I did a quick calculation and 7.5 hp is theoretically 25A at 220V. Assuming 80%, that is still "only" 32A so still a little pessimistic at 38A nameplate it would seem for running draw. I'd try to find motor manufacturer, probably.
--



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