Drilling Ash, much smoke, sage advice anyone?

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Yep.. that was going to be my recommendation.. For production work, carbide is the way to go..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Sure, here's a couple:
www.ibiblio.org/twa/info/drillSpeedChart.pdf (pdf warning)
http://www.woodcraft.com/Articles/Articles.aspx?articleid80 (chart in right sidebar about 1/2 way down the page)
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On 9/4/2010 11:18 PM, Larry W wrote:

And it says 500 RPM for hardwood.

That article also discusses carbide and high speed steel bits and is not at all clear whether that chart is safe speeds for carbon steel bits or best cutting speeds for carbide or what.

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Perhaps on hard and resin wood (maple is sugar) use the peck mode And let the cutting flange cool. Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 9/4/2010 8:01 AM, Larry W wrote:

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wrote:

Nope. I have a boat-load of Ash (probably 300bf left of 600) and have never had that problem with drill bits. Sometimes I'll see a burn mark from a saw blade but never smoking drills. It is hard stuff, though.
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Wow, I just realized how deep you are drilling. Drilling that deep in hard stuff would be bound to heat the bit.
Try a closely directed stream of compressed air on the bit. Cool that sucker with air, and slow down the drilling process if the burning is objectionable.
--
Jim in NC



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"J. Clarke" wrote:

Trying to clear chips from a forstner bit in a 3" hole can be a problem.
Think I'd use a brad point drill for this operation.
Lew
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On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 22:55:27 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Sorry - couldn't resist.
Seriously - I'd try a carbide bit
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