Drawing

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Larry Jaques wrote:

I think what Krenov left me with is a reverence for wood that I'll never shake. And when someone acuses me of being A-R, all I have to do is think of him and I feel sort of validated...lol : )

Oh, so now you're calling me a blind squirrel! Maybe without my glasses.. : )
Bill

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This is A Good Thing(tm), Bill. Lord Roy, Krenov, Eric Sloane (who wrote _A Reverence for Wood_), and maybe even Norm (of Normite fame) all did that for me. Roy and Eric were first.

Har! I can just hear you brainmumbling "See? I'm not the worst."

Oh, I thought you were talking about me. Never mind. ;)
P.S: The god of wood known as Lord Roy actually goes by the name Roy Underhill.
-- You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club. --Jack London
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Har! You say worst like it's a bad thing. On my recent DP baseboard project, I was building a drilling template so that I would place my (relatively fancy) screws (3) consistently in the proper position at the end of each of the five 2by8 boards.
I seemed to have trouble marking the exact center of the template, just a short 2by8 board, with a knife. I was trying to mark it with my Starrett combination square to the nearest 64th, or better (a little joke). I never measured 64ths before or used a knife to mark wood and I encountering difficulty. I ended up taking my bifocals off and got my eyes right down there next to the knife and the rule and it occurred to me that working like that was almost dangerous and that Mike or Larry would probably acuse me of being A-R about it! About that time I remembered to prop the rule up and I learned to use one eye due to my astigmatism, which probably accounts for some of my difficulty. In retrospect, using a 1 1/2" thick drilling template surely negated most of my "precision" anyway, but that did not occur to me at the time. So, I got a few good lessons from my unnecessary drilling template... BTW, it really IS TRUE that a center-punch (or chisel, I guess) will find the marks cut by a knife better than ones marked by a pencil! In fact, if two cut lines cross you can center-punch their point of intersection perfectly without even looking--and I enjoyed taking all of the advantage of that...
Bill
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Fancy heads on screws hidden in the attic? Um, OK.

Hah! Deflection, if I ever saw it.

Why not abuse a pair of dial calipers next time? Open them to the measurement you want, hang one side off the tubawhatever, and mark with the knife at the other jaw, or scribe directly with the stainless jaw of the dial calipers. I do that regularly with a pair of Chinese dial calipers bought 25+ years ago, and the jaw's still there, looking practically new. (Don't anyone mention this to anyone over in Wreck.Metalheads, though. They'd have heart attacks.)
Alternatively, measure with a micrometer, mark with chalk, and cut with an axe.
Ball's in your court.
-- You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club. --Jack London
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On 6/24/2011 7:05 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I do that all the time too. Why on earth hasn't somebody yet invented a good woodworker's marking tool with a dial caliper gauge built into it?
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Not a bad idea... Anyway you can eke up to the center line from both sides sounds like a reasonable approach. Of course, pencil lines are too wide to use!
Bill
I do that regularly with a pair of Chinese

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Bill wrote:

This technique is not good enough for the metal workers, huh? What's wrong with 'em? LOL
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They want stuff, even wood, measured down to the tenths. No, no. We're talkin' 0.0001". Hmm, you'd probably get along with 'em.
-- You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club. --Jack London
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Thanks, I assume you mean that as a compliment! : ) If your goal is to make stringed instruments, you need to position those frets just right!

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But of course!

Soooo, how many wooddorkers are also luthiers, hmmm?
-- Invest in America: Buy a CONgresscritter today!
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Well, the CEO of Grizzly, for one. He's got pictures of quite a few of his instruments on the Grizzly web site and in the Grizzly catalog.

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On 6/25/2011 3:29 PM, Bill wrote:

I'd *like* to be, at some point, but I don't play any stringed instruments so that's a bit of a hurdle. I have Cumpiano and Natelson's "Guitar Making" book sitting on my shelf that I occasionally study with great interest, and maybe someday I'll take the dive. But even if I don't, I still want my measuring and marking tools to be as accurate as possible. For some of the stuff I build, I get pretty anal about the joinery. :-)
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
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Yeah, their Luthier's Catalog is cool, too. So, that's one. How many others are? I know a few guys here dabble.
-- Invest in America: Buy a CONgresscritter today!
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Well, enough that they added a "Musical Instruments" section to the Sawmillcreek.org woodworking forum. I haven't had time to visit it.
Studley, of the infamous Studley Toolbox was a piano repairman (I think).
Martin and Taylor count too, no?
The idea of being a musician and and working wood, and not wanting to build an instrument seems just... inharmonious! : )
Bill

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OK, how many of the hundred who post here every week are?

Play it again, Sam.
-- If you are pained by external things, it is not they that disturb you, but your own judgment of them. And it is in your power to wipe out that judgment now. -- Marcus Aurelius Antoninus
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I said:

I forgot to comment on the reviews: They should have stuck with their copies of Dumb and Dumberer. They obviously have no imagination.
-- "Human nature itself is evermore an advocate for liberty. There is also in human nature a resentment of injury, and indignation against wrong. A love of truth and a veneration of virtue. These amiable passions, are the latent spark. If the people are capable of understanding, seeing and feeling the differences between true and false, right and wrong, virtue and vice, to what better principle can the friends of mankind apply than to the sense of this difference?" --John Adams
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Yeah, they are probably not Wreckers. IIRC, the 3rd reviewer actually liked the book. I will keep my eyes open for it.

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Betty Edwards' Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain has become a standard text for college drawing classes. Most 101 level exercises -- such as blind contour, drawing upside down, drawing only the "negative space" surrounding the model -- are taken straight from Edwards. This book, and a lot of practice, will help you draw well enough not to have to rely on a computer.

As much as I know AutoCAD, I do most of my design work on a sheet of butcher paper with a regular #2 pencil. It feels natural, and I can relate to the space on that big sheet of paper more easily than I can on a tiny 14" monitor.
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Father Haskell wrote:

I went and read about 100 reviews of Edwards' book again (at Amazon). It sounds alot like a psychology book--spending a lot of words defending the "right brain" concept. Comparing their tables of contents, I liked that of "How To Draw What You See" better than "DOTRSOTB". I'm sure both books have a lot to offer. I'm not sure what you mean by "draw well enough not to have to rely on a computer". I can produce a pretty realistic looking apple on a piece of paper, but I don't think I could do as well on a computer--even an Apple. ; ) I assume that you meant for drawing things like furniture. But it seems hard to beat SU for doing what it does well. I view paper and SU as complementary.
I've haven't had any drawing instruction since high school (and what I received there was not intensive at all), but I practiced alot back in those days and I can create 3D looking drawings. If I really give a drawing my best effort, it will plateau with a decent level of mediocrity that I am familiar with. I was hoping that with some knowledge of new ideas, that I might be able to heighten this ceiling. I ordered the older book "Engineering Drawing" by French and Vierck (sp), even though it is perhaps not directly related to those we are currently discussing. I'll probably save most of my drawing/design time for winter when it's harder to do as much in the shop--though I must admit I sketched for an hour or so last week and found it quite relaxing.

I've never used AutoCAD. But I know you can get a much bigger monitor for not too much money these days! I do understand what you are saying about paper vs computers as I haven't been able to warm up to e-books yet...
Bill
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Betty's book challenges you quite a bit. Try drawing an upside down picture of a rocking chair. It challenges all you know about perspective. DAMHIKT.

The last time I was on Oahu, I drove out to the Ho'omaluhia Botanical Gardens in Kane'ohe and sat in a perfect place and sketched the beautiful, green, nearly vertical volcanic mountain range in the background and the tropical trees in the foreground. It was just great, listening to the different birds, until the damned gardener came and started mowing the lawn in front of me. 50 minutes of bliss, anyway. (not his fault)
I saw a tree I was going to lean against while I sketched and walked toward it. Upon getting closer, I decided against it, choosing a nice coarse palm trunk instead. The ceiba I had chosen from afar had nasty spikes on the trunk. http://goo.gl/aVWRI

I'm still having a love/hate relationship with them. I think the new flat screens are better on the eyes than the old CRTs, though. I find myself reading more online now, and watching Netflix movies streamed on the computer.
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
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