Dovetail Marking Trick in a.b.p.w.

Don't want to start a Pins First - Tails First thread but whichever way you go you've got to do one then use it to mark the other. And that's where the fun comes in - holding one on the other and keeping the positions fixed while you scribe or pencil lines. If either moves while your marking you're screwed.
I've posted an easy solution to alt.binaries.pictures. woodworking - and the clamps are relatively cheap - about $5 each and you only need two. They're aluminum ( or aluminium for the Brits) and Pony makes the ones shown.
Hope this takes some of the frustration out of doing handcut dovetails cause they can be fun to do.
charlie b
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Dang, for some reason, Outlook Express is detaching those attachments and I can't see the pictures. Do you have them on a web site too, perhaps?
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Dang, for some reason, Outlook Express is detaching those attachments and I can't see the pictures. Do you have them on a web site too, perhaps?
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Tools.. Options.. Security.. "Do not allow attachments to be saved or opened that could potentially be a virus"
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I'm guessing you are describing using little Pony miter clamps to hold the two pieces in position while marking, no? (I can't get binaries through here.) If so, just to give credit where credit is due, Chris Becksvoort (sp?) mentioned that tip in passing in an article in FWW a couple of years ago. Ever since I first tried it, I've been trying to pass the word on, because it simplifies marking tremendously.
Anyhow, I'll second charlieb's suggestion. Try it and you'll never go back to trying to balance one piece on top of the other while marking. For long pieces you may need to provide additional support for the piece being held on top, as the little clamps can flex under pressure, but I simply grab a few scrap pieces of wood and stack them until I get the right height to give some help to the clamps.
Chuck Vance
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www.delorie.com has posts from both.
On 24 Sep 2003 05:13:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@swt.edu (Conan the Librarian) wrote:

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I know that Delorie is doing the posting of the pics for free and all that, but it still is annoying that a large number of the posts don't show up on his "archive". The topic of this thread, for example, isn't on his site. I guess I don't understand the reason for his effort if he's not going to post each and every picture.
Mike
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There are a LOT of inquisitive idiots.
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Conan the Librarian wrote:

snip
Chuck:
Just goes to show that there ain't nothin' new under the sun and especially in woodworking. For those without access to binaries groups I've added the photos to the appropriate page on handcutting dovetails - with credit to Mr. Becksvoort (sp?) (all one line)
www.wood-workers.com/users/charlieb/DovetailDrawer10.html
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SNIP

Thanks. That is a great site !. I have been contemplating on trying my hand at hand cut dovetails and the instructions will help a lot.
Regards George SA
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Ain't that the truth. Still, I think it's cool that you came up with the idea independently of Becksvoort. It goes to show that even if there's nothing new, there are still great minds at work out there. :-)

Before I forget, kudos on your webpage. With all due credit to our friend on the other side of the pond (you, Jeff), it has the best illustrations and step-by-step descriptions of any ww'ing page I've seen.
Outstanding work, charlieb.
Chuck Vance
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I do instructions for myself as I'm learning something new and if they work for me I figure others could use them.
As for kudos I guess "ah shucks" is about right. Jeff is not only in a whole other league, I'm not even on the same planet. If he wasn't a teacher he should have been.
Now if I can only work up the courage to cut the dovetails on the 8/4 apron stock for my bench. Cutting dovetails in 3/4 cherry is very different than cutting them in 8/4 stock. I keep foreseeing the 68 inch long bench top slowly being whittled down to cutting board size.
charlie b
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That's a good approach. I used to make extensive notes when I was first tackling a project or a particular skill. Now that I know everything ;-), I've stopped making notes, but it's almost a shame. I got a kick out of re-reading some of what I had written, and it could help me not make the same mistakes ovewr and over again. :-}

Whether he *was* or not, he certainly *is* now. He covers a broader range of subjects than you do, but I haven't seen anyone who has such clear and thorough illustrations as the ones on your site.
Anyhow, you're doing great work.

:-) Just go for it. Ironically, you may find that it's easier to cut accurately in stock that's thicker than standard 3/4. I don't have a lot of experience with thick stock and dovetails, but when I made a gardening bench out of 8/4 stock, I found that it was fairly easy to keep the saw straight, as you have more to reference your sawcuts against.
I know that I have had more trouble with thinner (less than 3/4) stock, because if you start the slightest bit offline, there's no chance to correct as you cut. (And thin stock wants to flex more in the vise, which compounds the problem.)
Which reminds me of another "helpful hint" for cutting dt's: If you have thin stock, try clamping two tail boards together when laying out and sawing. (Of course this only works if you do them the "right" way: tails first. ;-) This saves some time and gives a better reference for your sawcuts.
Chuck Vance
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SNIP

Well, Between your site and Jeff's site on the other side of the pond (or up North from me in South Africa), I must say that there is enough to get me started in hand cut dovetails. I like the illistrations on Charlie's site. Jeff also has some great info on using hand planes plus a lot of other stuff realy worthwile.
All I can say is thanks for sharing your knowledge.
Regards George SA
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My dovetail jig holds the parts great. I do all my marking with a dovetail bit (while it spins in a router). :)

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CW wrote:

But when you've got dovetails to cut in 8/4 stock whatcha gonna do?
charlie b
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Bigger jig.

dovetail
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CW wrote:

OK, bigger jig, bigger router - but where're you gonna get a dovetail bit with 2+ inches of cutting edge and how many people will it take to hold the router. Better yet how're you gonna find ANYONE who'd try it?
My problem is that my dozuki and dovetail saw will only cut to a depth of about 1 1/2 inches. Really don't want to have to buy a good tenon saw as well.
As an aside, was really surprised that the kerf made by the LN dovetail saw is only very slightly wider than that made by the dozuki saw. The latter blade seems so much thinner and the set on the teeth practically non-existent.
charlie b
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Charlie, when I built my bench; I got a PAX (rip cut) dovetail saw that cuts about 2 1/4" deep. It works great and is about half the cost of the LN dovetail saw.
--
Alan Bierbaum

Web Site: http://www.calanb.com
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That's when you use a framing nailer... ;~)

dovetail
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