dolls House plans


Hi folks,
Just curious where I can find plans to make a basic dolls house for my two year old daughter.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This'll get you a free 3-story dollhouse plan in PDF format. You'd best get busy though if you want it done in time for Xmas. BTW, its way more than one for a 2 yr old but then they take awhile to build anyway so...
For one so young, I'd lean more towards a painted cardboard box w/ an opening door & cut out windows. That way if its trashed its no big deal.
Grandpa John
http://www.thewoodcrafter.net/projects.html
Arbroath Smokie wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First off all, it isn't the older girls who like Barbie but the younger ones. I have no idea why. But the Barbies need doll houses an inch taller per floor than the dolls themselves - IIRC the Barbie doll is 12" tall so each floor has to be 13" tall for the Barbie to walk around. See http://www.hobbyworldinc.com/dollplan1.html and "139-467-4 Country House "Play scale" 1/6" for Barbie dolls. For a two year old girl I would eliminate the little drawer underneath and eliminate the peaked roof. Probably would get rid of the front porch, too. I'd put swivel wheels on boards added to the bottom the stuck out two inches in the front and back (give the dollhouse a wider base which would be less tippy). If you added a two inch ridge to the flat top she could store some interesting items up there.
if you added a strip of plywood down each side of the back you could add two doors to close the house when not in use and the child could store other treasures in the house when she got older.
Also see plans like this DOLL HOUSE PLANS FROM BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS http://www.woodworking-heaven.flowerpotheaven.com/doll-house-kits-plans.shtml
But if it's going to be Barbies, then check the ceiling height!
Josie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I built that one. If you would like to see the finished product it can be seen at
http://webpages.charter.net/ray93402/Woodwork/woodwork.html
I cut all the parts myself. The tools used for building it were a table saw, a bench sander and a thickness planner. I spent about $30 for the wood.
Ray

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nice job, all the projects in fact! Grandpa John
ray wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ray wrote:

Off topic for this thread, but how did you do the "lye treatment" that brought out the maple pattern for the rubber stamp chest-of-drawers? I found some beautiful rippled maple that I'd like to use as a backboard for some small lights in my game room, and want to accent the ripple pattern.
Michael
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lye is sodium hydroxide (NAOH). A source of pure NAOH is Red Devil drain cleaner. This is carefully added to water and applied to the wood. The amount of darkening is dependent on the concentration. A teaspoon to a pint is a starting point. Do not get any lye on your skin. Make the wood darker than you want because it will lighten up when dry. Wash with water and neutralize with vinegar and finish as desired. I also use this treatment on cherry to give it a head start on the natural aging process. Others use dyes to accent patterns in curly maple. This works because curly maple the grain goes from flat grain to end grain and back. The end grain absorbs more dye. Stains usually end up looking blotchy. I prefer the lye method.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.