Does size really matter?

Hello everyone, like the subject didn't ya? Anyway my question is IRT the bandsaw. I have been told that a 3/16 in blade should make a fairly tight turn. Well I have a craftsman 9 in tabletop model and I can't see how to make a very tight turn. I can't find blades any narrower to fit it either. This is not the three wheel craftsman, its a two wheeler. I am mainly looking to do small scroll type work in material 3 to 4 in thick (too big for my lil scroll saw). Thanks.
Phil
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Fear No Evil wrote:

First question is, who is IRT the band saw?
UA100
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I believe he meant "In regard(s) to", or "in relation to". Tom Size doesn't matter, unless of course, you're having sex... Work at your leisure!
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From my G0555 manual:
Blade width Radius of tightest turn 1/8" 1/8" 3/16" 3/8" 1/4" 5/8" 3/8" 1 1/4" 1/2" 2 1/2" 5/8" 3 3/4" 3/4" 5 1/2"
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Interesting how with the increase in the size of the blade, the radius of the tightest turn appears to increase almost geometrically in size Any reason for this, perhaps blade thickness? I don't own a bandsaw so don't have any experience in this area.
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The radius you can cut is limited by the relationship between the width of the kerf (determined by blade "set" and thickness)and the width (front to back) of the blade. If your blade cut a path equal to the blade width (front to back), you could turn 180 degrees in its own tracks; a zero radius turn. Such a blade wouldn't cut very well in practical use. It would wander incessantly, twist easily, have too much set in the teeth and eat your tires, etc. etc. Compromises must be made, so we have wide blades that track well on fairly straight lines and narrow blades that are good on the twisties.
The OP is asking too much of his equipment. Tight turns in 3 to 4 inch material isn't a realistic expectation for his saw. He'll have much better results with 1/4 to 1/2 inch material. A well tuned 14 inch saw with specialized blades might be able to do it.
DonkeyHody
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So if I understand correctly what you're saying, is that the diameter of the blade set stays pretty uniform in size even though the blade size increases.
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wrote in message

In general, yes, though of course there are exceptions. I know it's wishy-washy, but I haven't done an exhaustive study of all the blades available. I'd expect the extremely narrow blades to cut a narrower kerf, but at some point, probably about 1/4" blade width, the kerf stops growing wider. But if you think about it, any blade, whether it's a bandsaw or a jig saw, can't turn any tighter when the trailing edge of the blade binds against the side of the kerf.
DonkeyHody "Every man is my superior in that I can learn from him." - Thomas Carlyle
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On Sun, 22 Aug 2004 17:45:22 -0500, "Fear No Evil"

I think the people that make Timberwolf blades (Suffolk Machinery) will make a custom length blade for you.
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