Disc Sander Question

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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 23:30:09 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

...and then only if it's a flat taper, not a crown.
-- If the only prayer you ever say in your whole life is "thank you," that would suffice. -- Meister Eckhart
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: It's called a beveled disk.
: If you think on it, you'll see that the center of a rotating disk moves much : less abrasive against the work than the outer edges.
With you so far.
: The beveled edge evens out the contact.
I'm not seeing how.
If you push a piece of work against the entire surface, the : parts of the work in contact with the outer edges of the disk will have more : material removed than the center.
Only if you're pushing hard enough to bend the wood, or to deflect is away from the right angle of pproach to the disk,
-- Andy the confused
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wrote:

see: http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/catalog/sn_conical_sanding.htm
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 19:18:53 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Does it wobble, too? I'd return it.

If you're trying to flatten a surface, it will be a big issue.

Some choices:
1) Return it to HF and measure the other models they have in stock, taking the best one.
2) Return it and try one of their 12" models for $35 more. If you used a 20% off coupon, be sure they apply that discount to the new purchase price.
3) Return it and call Grizzly. Have them ensure that you'll get a flat one if you order from them, then order it there. http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-Disc-Sander/G7297 12" I get $191.65 as a delivered price to Oregon. YMMV.
G'luck!
-- Make the best use of what is in your power, and take the rest as it happens. -- Epictetus
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wrote:

No wobble at all. I would have already returned it if it did.

Now I'm really confused. Some say that it's a beveled disk and can be used as a joiner, you say it's an issue if I try to use it to flatten a surface. Isn't a joiner used to flatten a surface (edge) for gluing?

A fine suggestion, if I feel like taking the plastic straps off the boxes, cutting the packing tape, removing the packing foam, lifting the units out of their boxes and taking them out of the plastic bag. Then, after checking each disk - 'cuz I'm a nice guy - reversing the whole process and packing them all up again. ;-)

Why would switching to a 12" model ensure that I would get a flat disc?

That's a bit high for my needs. $89.99 - $20 (on a $100) purchase fit my budget (and gift cards).
As far as what I plan to use it for (mostly rounding the corners on wood (and aluminum) stock) the "bevel" might not be an issue since I'll really just be using the down stroke side of the disc anyway.
I'm really just curious if that's how it's supposed to be.

Thanks!
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

So does everybody else. Never try to do so otherwise.

Hard to say.
The ones with a built in bevel are meant for saws where you can tilt the plate so the "bent" part is vertical; once done you don't have to worry about the board catching the leading edge of the disk (in addition to being able to join). The same holds true with your disk (except for the joining).
I don't buy the idea about the edge being set back so it won't sand so fast...if it isn't touching the wood it isn't going to sand regardless of how much faster the edge is traveling relative to the center. Cute idea though.
The center on mine is slightly higher too but not by 1/16, more like a RCH. If I want to square up an end I pass the wood from right to left; the center sands away slowly (good, doesn't burn the wood as easily) and if there is still wood to sand the edge whisks it off more rapidly but there is less pressure. You shouldn't be trying to take off 1/16 in one pass, though.
Finally, if you just have to have the plate square, set the miter gauge so it is so.
--

dadiOH
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Thanks for the info.
How does one use a disc sander as "joiner"? I'm just not seeing that.
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On 3/27/2011 4:32 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

Simply set up a slight angle and run the opposite edge along the disk against the fence and you'll end up w/ a sanded straight edge on the other side -- a poor man's jointer if lacking one (or the obvious better expedient of a hand plane).
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 14:32:06 -0700, DerbyDad03 wrote:

It's "jointer", not "joiner". A flat sanding disc will leave arcs on the wood. If the disc is tapered and then tilted so it is vertical, only a small area of the disc touches the wood, thus eliminating the arcs. This gives a smooth edge. A jointer leaves machining ripples on the edge so still needs a little sanding - the disc does not.
That said, it's often easier to sand or plane out the ripples than it is to set up the sanding disc on the table saw :-).
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You do realize that I bought a Disc Sander, not a Sanding Disk, right?
http://www.harborfreight.com/10-inch-bench-top-disc-sander-47404.html

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"DerbyDad03" wrote:
You do realize that I bought a Disc Sander, not a Sanding Disk, right?
http://www.harborfreight.com/10-inch-bench-top-disc-sander-47404.html ---------------------------- I think what most realize is you got what you paid for.
Lew
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Considering the quality of most of the stuff that Horrible Fright sells, I'm not sure he got even that much.
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I agree!
That said, I'm still not sure what I got.
All other things quality-related being what they are, this question is still on the table (no pun intended):
Is my disc tapered because it was designed that way or is my disc tapered due to poor workmanship?
Since there certainly appears to be an "object" known as a tapered disc, could it be that this is what comes with the HF Disc Sander or are tapered discs only used on table saws?
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You bought it at Harbor Freight. You paid 80 bucks. Do you *really* need to ask that question? :-)

Obviously that's "what comes with the HF Disc Sander" -- the question is whether it's intentionally so.
Seriously, though: the disc should be flat. Maybe not dead flat -- a disk sander is not, after all, a precision tool -- but it should *not* be out by 1/16" across an 8" disk.
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On 3/28/2011 12:57 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

I refuse to let you guys worry me about the birdbath I recently bought from Harbor Freight! If it can't hold water it's going back (and yes there is a screw going right through the bottom of the bowl, with a rubber washer)! Seriously though, I'd just repair that. I hope the birds aren't too rough on it... ; )

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I would take it back. I had a disk sander made at a local machine shop years ago and from the way I use it, have used it, and have used other disc sanders, it would be almost useless and screw my wood machining up.
Sometimes you need/ want the whole width of the wood to be completely flat and I have no other awareness of why you would want a cone peak in the centre. This makes it a half diameter disc size from what you paid for in my book. To shear off the back of a box or similar wide wood piece you would need to run the piece across the surface and risk waves in you work as you hit harder and softer pieces to sand. Try planing a door edge completely flat with a 8" long plane. Similar thing and you pay for size just like the women that hire you....LOL
----------------
"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
That said, I'm still not sure what I got.
All other things quality-related being what they are, this question is still on the table (no pun intended):
Is my disc tapered because it was designed that way or is my disc tapered due to poor workmanship?
Since there certainly appears to be an "object" known as a tapered disc, could it be that this is what comes with the HF Disc Sander or are tapered discs only used on table saws?
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wrote:

I agree!
That said, I'm still not sure what I got.
All other things quality-related being what they are, this question is still on the table (no pun intended):
Is my disc tapered because it was designed that way or is my disc tapered due to poor workmanship?
I would say it is either poor workmanship or the disk should have been attached to some other kind of sanding machine.
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 20:30:50 -0700, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yes I do. If either the table or the disc tilts you can use it just as I described by setting up a rip fence of some sort. If no tilt, then you can't use it as a jointer and should have a flat disc.
--
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IF you use the bench top sander which sands in the middle of the disk to sand the edge of the wood with the aid of some sort of rip fence, WHAT do you use to remove the sanding marks that will resulf. The scratch pattern will be 90 degreed to the grain dirrection.
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On Mon, 28 Mar 2011 14:51:20 -0500, Leon wrote:

This is turning into a seminar :-).
If you take a tapered disc and tilt it so that the taper is perpendicular to the table, the only part that touches the wood is a thin vertical slice. That slice is moving parallel to the table and to the grain. Yes, there's a very slight arc - a few degrees - pretty much invisible.
I've described this several times now. If you still don't understand it I can't help any more.
--
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