Delta Jointer 37-220

I know there are folks out there who have one of these machines.
I just got one (a minor gloat - for free). It's a bit rusted but nothing that bad that hasn't cleaned up with some Boshield, but the head is a bit more rusty than what I can do without taking it off the machine.
I downloaded the manual and instruction guide from the OldWoodworking Machine site and it was helpful to understand the mechanics. However, I be interested to know people's experience in taking the cutting off and reseating it. It is an easy or difficult job? What should I watch for?
Also, the out table has a hole in it and since the fence sort of swings from a pivot point on the in table, I thought there might be a hold down or bolt that held the table steady. The manual and parts diagram doesn't show that. Perhaps there's some maintenance to be done on the fence to prevent it from swinging? Or is that just how it runs?
Thanks in advance.
MJ Wallace
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<snip>

First, good job! Nice machine to use, and a really good price.
Secondly, the fellow from who I bought my jointer indicated something about a hole to mount a power stock feeder. Might this hole be something along those lines?
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

Don't know this one by model number and no pitchurs to go on but many had a set of tapped holes on the outfeed table for a sharpening attachment rather than feeders (as they would be in the way of the stock if the base of the feeder were mounted there)...
As for the original question re: the fence, I don't have a clue from the description. "Swinging" from where and which direction, first? The fence on any Delta jointer I've seen is center-mounted except for the little 4" guy which was on a round bar at the front end of the infeed table...
--
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First off, thanks to dpb and Patriarch for the responses.
After re-reading the manual, the second hole on the outfeed table is for another guard. The manual states that it will provide additional safety because the cutters behind the fence will be covered. I guess that happens if you narrow the fence, I always just leave the fence to rear.
The swinging fence is from the infeed table side and it pivots from the adjustment mechanism. The manual indicates that you clamp the table down, but I can't see yet that there is something on the machine that does that or you just use a clamp. I'm away from the machine for the next 24 hrs so I'll take another look tomorrow.
To let you both know. I tested both the tables and the fence and they were FLAT! I could only get a .001 feeler gauge in one or two spots. I just need to get the blades sharpened and the head cleaned up and it's good to go!
Here's the link to manual and exploded parts diagram:
http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/PubDetail.asp?ID 41&PubIDI0
Thanks again!
MJ Wallace
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

...
OK, that's the rear fence guy. I still don't exactly follow you about "clamping the table down" -- what do you mean more specifically?
And I don't follow "swinging" as a description of a normal movement on a jointer fence, either, but I'll presume you're talking about the angle of the fence wrt the table surface. I would call that a rotation. If you're asking about how to lock the fence in position, as the manual describes, it is a two-function handle. The rear acorn nut locks the angle of fence to the table while the handle in the most forward position tightens the slide against the bracket to lock the fence in position. When adjusted correctly and tight, the fence will be rigid. If that isn't the case, something isn't adjusted correctly or perhaps you don't have all the original pieces of the fence mount or something's broken or...
If I'm not on base w/ your question, try again...
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And I don't follow "swinging" as a description of a normal movement on a

I'll check tomorrow when I'm home. It maybe that the locking mechanism is worn or that piece might be missing, tho other than the spring for the guard, the machine appears to be intact.
Thanks for the reply. I'll let you know in a couple of days if I still have a question.
MJ Wallace
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

More likely the adjustment isn't correct so it doesn't clamp tight. W/ my slow dialup I didn't wait for all the pdf doc to load so didn't see the blownup diagram so not positive the exact details of the locking mechanism on that fence. The old Craftsman I had had a jamb nut that had to be at the proper distance for the handle to catch it and lock tightly. I presume this is similar. It may be the mounting bolt needs to be brought in closer or similar. Whatever it is, the secret is in that adjustment -- there's nothing else required to lock the fence rigidly for use...
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Dpb,

Fixed it. The angle adjustment on the jointer was loose. As soon as I tightened it, the fence became more rigid and didn't swing. Next is to remove the cutter head and perhaps replace the bearings and most assuredly replace the knives or at least sharpen them up.
Thanks,
MJ Wallace
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