Deep Garage Wall Cabinets


I'd like to make some deep wall cabinets for my garage...deep enough to house most of my portable power tools that come in cases. This is mainly just to clean up the looks of my garage/workshop. I was planning on measuring all my tool cases to see which one was the deepest and make the cabinets for the tools just slightly deeper than that. I'm suspect that these wall cabinets could be 20" (or more?) deep. If I use 3/4" plywood fastened with long (3") screws into studs, is there a guideline as to how deep a wall cabinet in this configuration can be? Is there a stronger configuration that I haven't considered?
Thanks, DW
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Clamshell cabinets.
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Searching "clamshell cabinets" on this group doesn't reveal anything. Care to elaborate?
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Fairly shallow cabinets with all the storage in the doors like this:
http://www.armordeck.us/images/products/images_main/MainImage_clamshell.jpg
You can store the cases face out, or with the face on the shelf.
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On 27 Apr 2005 13:25:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

===============The link you typed in shows basically what I though they would look like although I had never heard the term clamshell cabinets before....
BUT I think the original poster would be much better off taking your advice and building these rather then deep cabinets...
Deep cabinets are a major pain... things get shoved to the back and become lost ..and are never to be seen agaon until about a month after you were looking fot them...
Just my 3 cents (adjusted for inflation)
Bob Griffiths
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I'd like to make some deep wall cabinets for my garage...deep enough to house most of my portable power tools that come in cases. This is mainly just to clean up the looks of my garage/workshop. I was planning on measuring all my tool cases to see which one was the deepest and make the cabinets for the tools just slightly deeper than that. I'm suspect that these wall cabinets could be 20" (or more?) deep. If I use 3/4" plywood fastened with long (3") screws into studs, is there a guideline as to how deep a wall cabinet in this configuration can be? Is there a stronger configuration that I haven't considered?
Thanks, DW
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I made garage shelving the entire width of the back wall from 2x4s and MDF. You will save time and headache if you make them 24" deep, so you can rip a 4x8 piece of ply/MDF in two without waste. Look at HD by the fence section and you will find the metal braces - very strong, easy to install, etc. This is my second time making garage shelves this way and it is great. Only drawback is no doors - looks like another woodworking project!

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Hey neighbor...
Dunno - but I used French Cleats when attaching mine to the garage wall. A french cleat strikes me as the best way to hang something up that's going to be heavy.
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Here's a strong simple one that I came up with years ago. The weight of these rests on the floor and the wall is only used for stability.
I decided on 19" wide shelves that would hold the 18" x 13" moving boxes we had a bunch of. A 4x8 sheet of 3/4 ply gives 5 19"x48" shelves.
Make "ladders" with 2x4 uprights and 1x2 rungs. These need to be as tall as you want the shelving to be and 19" wide. The rung spacing corresponds to the shelf spacing. Do not use glue on the rungs so you can change the spacing in the future. Install the ladders against the wall(every 4') and secure them to the studs with metal rafter ties. Put rungs on both sides of the ladder if you will have side by side tiers of shelves.
Notch the corners of the shelves so the ends fit between the ladder uprights and on top of the rungs. Glue & screw 1x2 rails to the front and rear edge of each shelf for strength. There is no need to screw the shelves in place as the tongue that fits between the ladder uprights, and gravity, holds them in place.
I hope this description is clear enough.
Art
I'd like to make some deep wall cabinets for my garage...deep enough to house most of my portable power tools that come in cases. This is mainly just to clean up the looks of my garage/workshop. I was planning on measuring all my tool cases to see which one was the deepest and make the cabinets for the tools just slightly deeper than that. I'm suspect that these wall cabinets could be 20" (or more?) deep. If I use 3/4" plywood fastened with long (3") screws into studs, is there a guideline as to how deep a wall cabinet in this configuration can be? Is there a stronger configuration that I haven't considered?
Thanks, DW
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Denver Woody wrote: snip

snip
You actually put tools back in their cases? And you want to make CABINETS! to store the cases which actually have the tools in them? And you want to clean up the look of your shop?
You wouldn't happen to have a blood relative named Martha Stewart would you?
Hell, part of the fun of woodworking and having a "shop" is the organized chaos. "It looks like it ain't very organized but believe me - I can lay my hands on any tool in the place- in the dark even."
You need a big assembly bench. Plenty of storage space under one for all sorts of stuff.
charlie b sorry - just couldn't resist the tempation
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charlie b wrote:

....another snip ...

I can appreciate what Denver Woody is saying even as my workshop is the "ultimate" in chaos!! and agree with Charlie - I really 'can' pin point that item I need instantly and don't anyone dare be in my shop and move something even a couple inches!!
When I get to portable tools I often will create "tool kits" either by using the original case if I can make it work for me or with a custom case if not. The operative word in this is "kit" as an attempt to be mostly self-contained for a given task.
I started down this practice originally to meet my needs for portability with convenience (and no workshop) but continued it even now with a fixed workshop since the needs of our rental properties and the family and friends "help me please" calls needed tools on site. The 'kit' organization allowed me to just grab the relevant kit and go and have any most likely accessories, attachments and even hardware on hand for the job.
However these are double duty tools and not your 'in the shop' exclusive for fine carpentry and I think really can be organized as your needs demand. Even inside the shop I find things like the ROS kit with a variety of discs in the same container a big time saver ... then take the cordless drill kit!! with anything you could imagine !!
...but each to their own.
Ed
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