Danish oil and stain?


2 years ago I refinished an oak antique table, I was going to stain it a dark walnut to match the chairs, but hubby liked it natural so I applied the Danish oil.
Now I want to stain it walnut.
How do I take off the Danish oil without removing the natural patina so I can stain it?
CathyLee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You've presented quite a conundrum, CathyLee.
Dave
CathyLee wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1) Turn the table top over. 2) sand through the thickness of the material, until you reach the patina. 3) *stop* before you damage the patina. 4) fabricate a replacement section for that which was sanded away. 5) apply stain to the replacement section. 6) invert said replacement, so it is "top down", and position on the piece from steps 1-3. 7) press firmly. 8) turn back right-side up.
Any more questions?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Robert. While your advice is nearly always spot-on, I must object in this case and show that you have overlooked something. Danish oil is a _penetrating_ finish, not a surface finish. So, while your procedure might be perfectly valid for, say, a polyurethane or other surface finish, it just won't do in this case.
Unfortunately, once the Danish oil has penetrated, the best you can hope for to recolor it is a surface color treatment, and I've never seen one that looked good. Maybe modifying hubby's expectations would be easier.
Dave Hinz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think it might be faster to use a router to remove all of the wood leaving the patina.
;^)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 20:36:48 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Use a rotary veneer cutter to slice the patina off, veneer the oak with walnut, then re-attach the patina layer you saved from step 2.
Sorry, but I can't think of any way to do literally what you ask for. But why should you anyway ? Solid timber furniture is rare enough these days - leave your oak looking like oak.
You _might_ find that ammonia fuming the oak will darken it even through the danish oil. But I've never tried this, and I'd experiment first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In case you haven't figured out the responses - you're in deep doo-doo.
Say Hi to Frank -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank is out on a date...
Dave
Vic Baron wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You cannot. The natural patina is on the surface of the wood now and staining will cover that up along with the Danish oil finish appearance.
You can however simply stain over the Danish oil finish and see what you end up with.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a simple idea but it may be totally wrong because I am confused by your description.
You say you refinished an antique table but you kept the patina. Unless you used a very mild stripping process such as alcohol or lacquer thinner and were careful enough not to disturb all the patina, you surely did remove the patina. If you did remove the patina in the first go around, simply strip again using standard stripping processes and finish as you like.
If the patina was really left intact, try using a walnut colored Danish oil. You could always make your own. If that doesn't work, you may have to use a walnut toner but it is always risky to apply a new film finish over an existing finish.
Good Luck.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.