Dado repair... good idea.

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I have a ridge carbide dado, I gave it back to them last year to redo, the sizes were so far off I could not get close to 1/4 and the points were coming through heavily.
I needed to use it and it was heavliy rusted. They probably never put a rust preventitive on it after recutting the teeth. So I clean it up, and after using it, I hate waxing dadoes because they slip while on the arbor. But I had no choice, any rust preventitive was going to be a lube too. So after lubing it, I started thinking how am I going to keep them from spinning into each other.
I took out my engraver and just kept putting lines in a star burst from the arbor out, but actually brought them from out to the arbor hole.
They lock nicely and don't slide, each face probably added less than 2 10 thous so it's all good.
Just a tip brought to you by the woodchucker.. who is buried under snow.. 12-16 expected here today. I usually get the top end as we are in the mountains, but I am in a valley in the hills... so it just dumps here. I must have heard hundred times from the wife... do you have gas for the snow blower... :-(
--
Jeff

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On 2/13/2014 9:59 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Good tip
FWIW I have a Forrest DadoKing dado set. I love the set but like you my set will spin some times, some times not.
Here is what I have determined. Mine spin if I don't use the washer between the outer blade and the net. The friction between the nut and the outer blade causes the blade to reposition when I tighten the nut.
When cutting a narrower dado and using the out side washer I get no spinning when tightening the nut.
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On 2/13/2014 5:14 PM, Leon wrote:

is your spinning a result of wax or lube? or just steel to steel?
NET???
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Jeff

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Steel to steel, and mostly only the outer blade against the nut when tightening.
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Jeff,
I have used Dri Cote with no slipping problems for years. And have had good luck with Top Cote on cast iron surfaces. However, I seem to recall that they have changed their names, but should be easy to find in the catalogs.
--
Dan Kozar

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On 2/13/2014 7:32 PM, Dan Kozar wrote:

Thanks, but I already did the engraving. Seems like the knurling (a form of) will do the trick. If I run into another situation I'll consider them. Between all the stuff out there, it's hard to remember which does what. Boeshield, topcote, dri cote, and others.
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Jeff

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wrote:

Bostick bought DriCote and renamed it BladeCote (TopCote is now GlideCote). They're the "same thing" ("scare quotes" because some believe they changed the formula). They seem to be much more available these days, though if you buy on the Internet, watch the shipping costs!
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Actually Bostick bought Topcote from Empire back in the 80'- 90's and recently renamed it. I suppose there was a non compete clause as Empire only started competing again 10+ years ago.
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On 2/13/14, 9:59 AM, woodchucker wrote:

I use bow string wax on my drumsticks to increase grip. I actually used it on some paint brushes the last couple weeks because the dry cold was really effecting my grip.
I know you already came up with a solution, but for those listening in bow string wax it would prevent rust but not be slippery. It can be found at any sporting good store with an archery section.
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-MIKE-

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On 2/14/2014 12:27 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

FYI
So from what I see 1.25 oz of bow string is about $7. DriCote, blade cote is $10-$17 for 10.75 oz.
Top Cote (lube) now Glide Coat $10 for 10.75 oz.
Boeshield (lube) is about 18 for 12oz.
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Jeff

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On 2/14/14, 9:44 AM, woodchucker wrote:

The stuff I use is about 4 bucks out the door... (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Those aren't accurate price comparisons, for what it's worth. The volume/weight/whatever of the bow string wax is all wax. With those canned products that volume also includes the propellants and carriers for the actual lube or coating. I would speculate that you're actually getting close to the same amount of product with the tube of wax than the aerosol can.
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On Fri, 14 Feb 2014 10:12:22 -0600, -MIKE- wrote:

Not only that, but those other products are *slippery*! The exact opposite of what is wanted in this case.
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On 2/14/14, 11:08 AM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Exactly. I don't get his post at all.
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On 2/14/2014 1:22 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I was merely referring to the advice given by others on products.
How easy would it be to spread and buff out the bow wax? Seem like bees wax, as bees wax always seems sticky in raw form.
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On 2/14/14, 12:34 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Seems like? I don't think "seems like" is relevant to this discussion.
You don't buff it out. It's pretty darn easy to rub that tube up and down my sticks a few times. You could do the same thing to the side of a saw blade in about ten seconds. No need to spread or buff. It would only need to be in contact with a small percentage of the blades, anyway. He's trying to stop the blades from slipping. This is an uncommon problem and it would take very little *added* friction to solve it.
The real point, however, is that this isn't a lube. He wanted something to prevent rust that wasn't a lubricant. This is the only product of all of those that meets those requirements.
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wrote:

You would need to spread it if you want full coverage to prevent rust - which was, let's face it, the FIRST thing he was trying to accomplish. A few strokes of the wax stick is NOT going to prevent the blade from rusting.

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On 2/14/14, 6:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You're right, I neglected to cover that. Ehem.... add another ten seconds to cover the whole blade.
Love this group... half guys who really are looking for advice and want to help others, and half guys who just love to bitch and moan and argue.
(BTW, who is selling saw blades that rust!?)
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-MIKE-

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On 2/14/2014 7:20 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

If he is talking about the same slipping I am it is between next chipper and the outer blade that is next to the arbor nut. In some cases you have to leave the washer off when the stack is too wide. If only the nut is applied to the outer blade the nut will often turn that blade when tightening. The outer washer is normally beveled on the nut side and there is less friction between it and the nut when tightening than there is when the nut is tightened up against the outer blade.
In a nut shell My outer blade slips against the chipper blade when I do not use the washer between the nut and the blade. I get no slipping when tightening when I use the washer.

I think what some don't realize is that wax it self is not slippery. Yes you wax your TS top to make it slick. BUT you have to buff off the excess before it becomes slick. It feels slick after buffing because the tiny imperfections in the metal have been filled and they no longer grab as much as when they were not filled. Same goes with waxing your car's paint. Surfers waxed their boards but do not wipe off the wax because they wanted to surface to not be slippery.

Forrest is one, actually any blade that I have owned and does not have paint on it has rusted to some extent.
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On Fri, 14 Feb 2014 17:08:13 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

Boeshield is not at all slippery. That's why I'm going to try switching to GlideCote (TopCote).
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On 2/14/2014 12:23 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Boeshield is not slippery at all, you have to buff it off before things begin to become close to slick.
The TopCotes products have always been the product that I go back to after trying another.
Many years ago when Empire made TopCote mid 80's it was only designed and or sold as a product to make the metal surface slick and came in a pump bottle. I discovered that it worked extremely well, so much that if I tossed a short board on top of the saw surface it was very likely to slide off the opposite edge. I also discovered that the product had a bonus feature, I no longer had a rust problem in humid Houston.
After they sold TopCote to Bostich it was never packaged the same and never worked as well. The old TopCote dispensed as a liquid that actually puddled on the saw surface and evaporated. The Bostich mostly comes out as a fog and does not seem to penetrate as well before evaporating.
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