cutting thin wood

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k wrote:

You can buy basswood in many small sizes that would work well for this. Stronger than balsa, and very fine grain that looks appropriate for modeling. You can it get it at shops that carry model railroading supplies
I wouldn't use a table saw to make this stuff. A band saw is MUCH MUCH safer for this kind of work. I use a 14" Ridgid to make the braces and bindings for my acoustic guitars. It helps to have a drum sander to sand 'em smooth afterwards.
--Steve
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First off, to be to closer to scale you want to go 1/8 x 11/32". 2x4's measure out to 1.5" x 3.5".
I would us Balsa wood and cut with an Exacta, or utility knife. Get the wood at a hobby store.
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I think you should get rid of that rule of yours.
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Limey Lurker wrote:

Actually, if the scale is 1 inch = 1 foot, the correct dimensions for an in-scale 2 x 4 (actually 1.5" x 3.5") would be 1/8" x 9/32"
If the scale is 1 to 16, then the correct dimensions would be 3/32" x 7/32"
--Steve
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Yeah, my mistake, assuming the 1/8 as the base, 9/32" would be the closest to 32nds?
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Leon wrote:

The correct dimension is actually .275" which slightly less than 9/32"
--Steve
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Well if we are splitting hairs, ;~) If the 2x4 the true size is 1.5" x 3.5" and if the 1.5" is scaled down to .125"(1/8"), The other would be .29166.....
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Leon wrote:

Ooops - you're right. Not sure what I did there, but 9/32" is still pretty close.
--Steve
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You probably did what I did the first time. LOL.
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wrote:

No actually that would be the bad entry in my spread sheet. LOL
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k wrote:

If you've got a band saw and a planer you could try it this way--resaw a board into pieces maybe 5/16 thick, then plane to 1/4. Now, cut those into maybe 3/16 strips. Plane to 1/8. Experiment first to get the right dimensions so that you can plane both sides smooth with enough allowance to get your finish dimension--the amount of allowance you need is going to depend on your particular tools and skill level.
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--John
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J. Clarke wrote:

Do you know what most planers will do to a 1/8" x 1/4" strip?
I do, as I've tried it. <G>
If I could reliably thickness plane to 1/8" thick without all kinds of faffing around with sleds, etc... I could have spent the cost of my Performax 22/44.
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B A R R Y wrote:

"Elsewhere" got chopped off the end of the last sentence by my brain! <G>
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B A R R Y wrote:

Chews the Hell out of the first and last six inches or so, where the piece is not being held down by both rollers. Accept it and treat them as throwaways.
Of course I've got a radial arm saw. One thing it does _real_ good is cut thin slices off a piece of 1/4 inch stock. But since he probably doesn't have one . . .
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J. Clarke wrote:

But the Performax works MUCH better for that kind of work. :-) Mine is a 10/20.
--Steve
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 14:32:11 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Sometimes, it splinters them in the middle, too!
--------------------------------------------- ** http://www.bburke.com/woodworking.html ** ---------------------------------------------
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It is easy to cut thin, narrow pieces like these with the right table saw accessory. I use a grip-tite magnetic featherboard with the roller guide. A sandpaper roller pulls the wood to the fence in front of the blade, and plastic springs hold the wood down before and after the blade. You push the first board thru the blade and under the springs with the next board. You have to use a zero clearance throatplate. The setup works on my aluminum saw. Had to clamp their steel plate to my fence to hold the magnets.There's a video on you tube.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzTo_lqcxfM
Be sure you use clear wood.
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