Cutting half laps with a dado blade?

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It's like any other piece of machinery on the market where competition and demand are what brings a price down. That fact that approximately 10% of the population have a mobility problem and even fewer would consider buying such a device means it's unlikely the price would ever decrease under current or previous market conditions.
That's why even a basic wheelchair capable of travelling around outside a hospital setting retails for $3000 and climbs from there. Medicare (Canadian in this case) with the recommendation of a doctor and/or physiotherapist will pay approximately 80%, but the money has to come from somewhere.
It's ironic since three similar wheelchairs sell for the equivalent of a small car, yet the engineering in a car easily outstrips that of three wheelchairs. However, the demand for cars also easily outstrips the demand for wheelchairs, so they just don't sell for the same price ratio.
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Upscale wrote: ...

...
There's the "why" primarily -- the cost is put off to the third party (and a government entity to boot) so there's absolutely no incentive to lower price as it's a non-competitive market.
--
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I wonder if our friend Rob from Lee Valley would be at all interested (considering their not so recent brach out into the medical services side of things?)>
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Doug Brown wrote:

Interesting thought.
What's really needed though is for someone to come up with a high volume market for the technology that allows the wheelchairs to be made inexpensively as a sideline.
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wrote in message

Ooh. An extreme off-road Segway? Segways cost considerably less and still have a hard time selling despite the technology glitz.
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Upscale wrote:

Upscale, at one time you pointed out to us that General was making a saw lower than most, specifically for people in chairs. Did you get one of those?
If not, is there any safe way that you can elevate yourself and/or chair to get over the table and blade so that you can see better when you're lining up?
Tanus
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On Sun, 02 Aug 2009 23:42:43 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Not a bad idea. I use an inexpensive round mirror with the built-in stand when handcut dovetails. It easily lets me see where I am cutting on the other side. I have two "mirror tools" in my shop.
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How about just clamp a board down in the place where you would put the fence? Of course you will ahve to ensure that it is parallel to the blade.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com says...

Well I do those on the radial arm saw, but all the same ... when I can't see exactly where I might be going because the original mark is facing away from me, I get my 6" engineer's square out and a marking knife and I scribe all 'round so I CAN see where the blade enters the wood relative to the mark - then adjust as necessary. Knife is much more accurate than pen, especially for this job, somewhat prevents splintering and I find my ageing eyes can pick a knife mark out more easily than the Rotring.
That little square is one of the tools I'd most hate to give up.
-P.
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says...

I have also put down a couple of strips masking tape in front of the blade on my table saw. Then I take a straight edge and place it along side the saw blade and score a line with a knife. Then I peal away one side of the tape and I now have a reference of where the side of the blade is. You could also draw a pencil mark.
I think I did a terrible job of explaining but I hope you get the idea.
Larry C
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I do understand what you explained. I was negligent in my original explanation by not explaining that I use a wheelchair and can't easily feed the wood and lean over it and at the same time watch the leading edge of the wood feed into the blade. Perhaps the solution is what I suggested to Morris which is an unconventional solution, but not in the realm of impossible.
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wrote in message

I think you're much better off just installing the fence and using the fence. I don't think I'm being a Safety Nazi in suggesting this. The usual safety-nazi stuff just comes from rote following the "rules" crap. *This* evokes a response somewhat more akin to "ARE YOU F*CKING KIDDING ME? Just shove your arm into the blade and be done with it." Not your usual SN response.
Give some serious thought to using a rabbet bit and featherboard on the router table. There's so much less setup and so much less to get wrong.
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wrote in message

Hmmm. Not in regards the RAS. That's perfectly reasonable. Just in general, the whole dancing around not having a fence ...
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I agree with Mike -- that is NOT even CLOSE to safe. I might not have put it quite the way he did... but I entirely agree. Climb-cutting like you propose is just *begging* to get the workpiece, and the miter gauge along with it, thrown back into your teeth.
Set the fence or a guide of some some sort, or use a sled or a jig. Get your measurements and setup correct, and it truly won't matter that you can't see the leading edge of the wood going into the blade. Make a few test cuts on scrap first, if you need to, to convince yourself. You really don't need to watch. Honest.
If you feel that you simply *must* line up a pencil mark on the back side of the blade, do it with the saw turned *off*. Then clamp the workpiece to the miter gauge, lower the blade below the table, pull the gauge to the front of the saw, raise the blade, and make the cut normally -- moving the wood away from you.
You don't say what you use for safety equipment, but if your eye protection consists only of goggles or safety glasses, please consider using a face shield instead. I haven't used goggles for at least ten years -- the face shield is so much more convenient, and protects so much more. Your eyes are not the only part of your face that need protection; imagine what it would feel like to take a kickback in the nose or teeth, or the larynx, where a high-speed impact could be fatal. Operating the saw from a seated position puts your face and throat that much more in the "line of fire" and makes a face shield that much more important.
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protection
I have and use a full face shield every time as well as a heavy denim smock that covers my upper body completely. There's just too many mini projectile slivers and sawdust coming off the saw blade for me to consider not using a face shield. I'm hoping to pick up the Kreg Mitre (or something similar) from Lee Valley tomorrow and with that I should be able to cut to any line, sight unseen.

of
That's something I didn't consider and might work well. Thanks.
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Upscale wrote:

Step #1 is to mark your board on the leading edge.
Step #2 is to have some way of aligning the edge mark with the blade edge.
In my case, I used a knife to scribe lines from each side of the blade onto the cast iron table and throat plate, sprayed paint onto same, wiped off excess paint leaving it in the scribed lines. I still prefer to use my radial saw for cutting out half laps.
--

dadiOH
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I'd clamp a straight board to the table top, parallel to the miter slots/blade, to act as a fence. This to control the length of the lap as would your regular fence. You could use an adjustable square with the head in a miter slot and the end of the blade against the "fence" to position the temporary fence.
John
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I sometimes make one cut at the line (where I want it) and then cut the rest out. You could even cut the line with a hand saw or router. The advantage to this is you gain a kerf's width of fudge room.
Another thing I did was mark the outsides of the blade on the little orange insert my saw has for doing this kind of stuff. That way, I've got a reference to work with before the saw blade enters the work. It's not always accurate with a wabble dado, though.
Puckdropper
--
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reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

How about if you use the method of making a first cut at your line with a saw of choice. That way you would have a reference point on the back of the board. Then take the method of extending a line from the edge of the blade to the front of the table saw. That way you would have the fudge factor of a saw blade and a reference point at the back of the stock to line up to the edge of the blade. Both would at the back of the stock.
Larry C
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Attach an adjustable stop to your miter gauge and sneak up on the cut.
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