Cutting down a solid-core door

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On 9/28/11 4:02 PM, dpb wrote:

I've also applied a sacrificial base plate for a circular saw. This protects the door from scuffs and it keeps the upper side of the veneer from splintering.
1/8" to 1/4" Hardboard works great because of the smooth face. Carpet tape works great for sticking the hardboard to the base plate of the saw. Tape the hardboard on with the blade all the way up, then turn on the saw and drop the blade into the hardboard. If you saw won't completely hide the blade, use a smaller diameter blade with the same kerf.
--

-MIKE-

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wrote:

But the blade needs to be CLEAN. A pitch-encrusted blade takes more than twice the power a clean blade takes - particularly in petrified saw-dust. A good shot with something like "brake kleen" will disolve the crud very quickly and you won't believe the difference in the cut.
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 19:37:22 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Safer, and usually also handy, is SimpleGreen. Soak the blade in it for 15-30 minutes, rinse (the pine tar falls off), and reinstall. Save the soak for a dozen or more blades. It lasts when bottled. I use a regular old pie tin for holding the solution.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air… -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 9/28/2011 10:14 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

nothing unsafe about brakleen, but it won't cut pitch like carb cleaner will.
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Steve Barker
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 22:22:15 -0500, Steve Barker

Brakleen works great on carbs, too, both for starting and cleaning the exterior, if you're unlucky enough to still be stuck with one.
I don't particularly like breathing all those VOCs, and you have to use a bit of caution with any flame near its use, and you don't want to spray/drip onto any painted surfaces with it. I only use it outside on windy days. <g>
SimpleGreen is much easier.
So, -yeah-, Brakleen has safety concerns...if you're awake enough. ;)
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air… -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 9/28/2011 10:37 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

a: brakleen is not flammable b: brakleen will not hurt paint. we use it all the time to remove tar c: brakleen will not clean the junk off a carb that needs to come off.
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On Thu, 29 Sep 2011 23:29:11 -0500, Steve Barker

Hmm, the stuff I have now is not Brakleen, it's O'Reilly Brake Parts Cleaner and it contains methanol, acetone, and toluene. EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE.
Brakleen containes Tetrachloroethylene, chloroethylene, and petroleum distillates. Hmm, NONflammable. http://www.rwsidley.com/MSDS/crc%20brakleen.pdf
Brakleen non-chlorinated contains methanol, acetone, heptane, and toluene. EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE. http://www.crcindustries.com/faxdocs/msds/5088.pdf
-- In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. -- Albert Camus
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On 9/30/2011 12:29 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

It most certainly is. http://www.crcind.com/wwwcrc/msds/AB11261-3.htm 2. Hazard Identification Health and Safety: Extremely flammable 5. Fire-fighting Measures Flash point: < 0 deg C

It most certainly will. Refer to the MSDS: it's 5 to 10% acetone. You won't see the damage to the paint until you use it the second or third time in the same spot, after the acetone has removed the clear coat.

That's probably true.
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Dougy posts "maybe and then maybe not" but just wants to be seen as an expert without actually knowing anything.
-------------- "Doug Miller" wrote in message That's probably true.
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 19:25:56 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) wrote:

If the brushes get hot enough the brush springs loose tension - then the brushes arc - which makes them run hotter - and the cycle repeats itself.
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I have to think the brushes were on the way out anyway. I cut several oak veneer six panel doors a year ago with a 30+ year old circular saw with no power issues. I consulted with a finish carpenter and he said the best way to ensure a clean cut, with the veneer doors, was to use a new, inexpensive, carbide-tip, thin-kerf blade. Dewalt and Irwin sell them for less than $10 at home improvement stores. That is what I did, using a clamped on straightedge, and it was a no-brainer. Don't forget to apply finish to the bottom fresh-cut edge and give it time to cure before installation (especially above carpet)..
RonB
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Set the blade to full depth. Runs cooler with less strain on the motor. You don't gain any safety advantage by setting a portable saw light, since your fingers are well-shielded by a 2" thick slab of wood.
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On 9/28/11 2:51 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

How is that?
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Shorter path through the wood. Easier for the gullets to eject chips.
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Makes sense to me.
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On 9/28/11 5:17 PM, Robatoy wrote:

It does, but it's also a moot point with a decent saw and blade.
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Should get a cleaner cut with the depth set to minimum, too.
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 15:17:56 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Eez true, too, mi compadre.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air… -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 9/28/2011 3:09 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

less cut being made at a time.
if you have the blade just *barely* through a inch and a half piece, then you have almost four inches of cut being made. if you have it at full depth, you are almost straight up and down with the cut and only making 1- 1/2" at at time.
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On 9/28/11 10:20 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

Like I've been saying, if you have to worry about heat or bogging down, you need a new saw and/or blade. There are other, better, reasons to keep the saw blade up.
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