Curly and quilted Maple.

See http://www.prsguitars.com/showcase/private/private.html Some guitars are curly. Some are quilted. At least one is both. I can see the difference in the look of the grain but how is this done? Is it a natural occurance in maple or is there some technique I might wanna know about?
Thanks, Kevin
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Its a natural occurance in maple, maple without any stain would almost be white in color. Warren

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Would anyone care to elaborate? I'd like to know what in particular causes maple to be curly or quilted and what would one look for in a maple tree to identify the quilted and curly parts as opposed to the regular parts. I've seen plenty curly maple on rifle stocks and fiddles and such but I've only seen the quilted on these Paul Reed Smith guitars. I think it's pretty cool.
Kevin

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To my knowledge, no one knows what exactly causes the irregular grain patterns found in many woods. Theories such as seasonal environmental stress, disease or insect stress might all be true, but who knows? As far as indentifying it - you know it when you cut into it and see it.

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