Cornering Tools

Lately I've taken to counting my strokes when breaking edges, in an effort to promote consistency. Additionally, I like to do *just* enough to make it look good without wasting any effort. My latest kick is 4 passes on hard maple drawer boxes. up-back-up-back
While this is certainly sufficient, I'm interested in knowing if anyone has had any experience with cornering tools that put a 1/16" roundover on an edge. Examples can be seen here... http://tinyurl.com/35xmy
I like the idea of one quick pass, a uniform edge, and no wasted effort. I don't like the idea of catching the grain of expensive hardwood that has been painstakingly milled to size. Has this been an issue? Are these legit? Some googling has produced mixed reviews...
What about the Radi-Planes? http://tinyurl.com/34b3a These have rec'd. somewhat better press. They appear to be somewhat sturdier, but the proof is in the..uhh..roundover.
JP **************** I can sand that board in 1 note.
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I prefer a carbide round over bit in a router.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com asks about Cornering Tools and Radi Planes...
My experience is: you get what you pay for.
Hope it helps Henry Bibb
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IME they suck. They're a PITA to hone, and unless you keep them honed to a razor edge -- and sometimes even if you do -- they're prone to catching on irregular grain, and tearing it out.

Me too, and me neither, respectively. That's why I switched over to using a 1/16" carbide roundover bit in a table-mounted router.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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wrote:

No. For that small a radius, I tend to use sand paper. A bit bigger and I might use a moulding plane. For thumbnail mouldings, it's generally a few passes with a block plane - I like the slightly unpredictable nature of the curve.
I've used the double-ended radiussing tools, but don't have my own set. If I asked though, I think their owner might give them to me - neither of us have been particularly impressed with them.
--
Smert' spamionam

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I have a radii plane and it works well, as long as you go with the grain. Nice and consistent, inexpensive as well. The size/depth is adjustable too. Mark L.
Jay Pique wrote:

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That's exactly what I would think in comparison with those other little deelybobs... A.
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I've heard mostly bad things about the "bottle-opener" cornering tools. Personally, I use a spokeshave or block plane when I want to do a slight roundover on an edge. (Come to think of it, I use them when I want to do a *big* roundover.) If the slight irregularity that these generate is a problem, you can always follow it up with sandpaper to knock down any slight ridges.
Chuck Vance
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