compressor tank failure mode

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Scuba tanks need to be grounded to the dust collector. Everybody knows that much! Geeeesh....
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

Right!
The tires on my road bicycles get filled to 125-140 PSI. I've had plenty of flats. Nothing scary to report.
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You say there was nothing scary to report,
"Me" filling the position of the typical "new" reporter on the staff at your local news agency questions......
First off could we say that you were not on a bicycle and you were actually in your car? That sounds soooo much more exciting. When you had your blow out, were there any by-standers that saw what happened? Do you think the rain we had last night contributed to the flat? Were the road conditions treacherous? Can you tell us where you were going when this all happened. What do you think would have happened had you run in to a concrete wall as a result of the flat? Do you think oil prices will cause you to buy a cheaper replacement tire? Did your ABS come into play? Were any of the other passengers in your car injured? Are you going to sue the tire company? Do you think the speed that you were driving at had any contributing factors to the this catastrophic tire failure? Being near the air port at the time were you in fear of hitting an air plane on the runway?
Conclusion:
This is "so in so" the next big reporter in "your home town" on the scene reporting on the terrible accident caused by poor quality tires near the airport where a vehicle" skidded into a crash" as a result of rapid air loss in the spare tire.
Back to you Domique.
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ANNNNNND we have a winner! The NTSB was on the scene, so was Chertoff, which rhymes with....
Back to you Glen Beck!
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

Okay, good point, low-pressure systems quite possibly aren't subject to the same regulations in terms of testing and certification, mea culpa. But I still treat any compressed gas with respect, I've seen too many people on their way to the hospital as a result of having too casual an attitude towards compressed gas, same as with any power tool.
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Catastrophic tank failures usually include a fuel source. Air pressure alone (within the range of the safety valve) is not likely to blow a tank apart and have shrapnel fly all over the place. There simply isn't enough stored energy to do that. It isn't a frickin' balloon.
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My compressor, a dual tank Emglo, was purchased in 1987. About 8 years ago it developed leakage around the bottom supports (the rails that hold it off the ground). A friend tried to repair it using a MIG welder, to no avail. Then I posted the problem to some newsgroup or another and someone posted his fix: use epoxy. I did so and am still using that compressor (though I think I'm beginning to hear another leakage hiss).
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Thanks, Lee. The important part for me is that it was a "leaking hiss", not a catastrophic failure. My carry tank is cheap enough that I will just replace rather than try to fix it when the time comes. But I am cheap enough not to want to replace it just because of some date stamp, as long as I am not creating a safety hazard.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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wrote:

If you use it in a business with other folks around, you might consider replacing to limit your liability regardless of how well you believe the repairs have been done. The ASME code certification is invalidated by repair to the tank without opening a new code certification which can be done, but not worth the cost on that type of tank. Very small chance of any injury, but it could blow a fitting or a glob of rust/epoxy.
if you use it for personal use then it doesn't really matter that much if you are confident of the repairs.
Frank
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I used to manufacture tanks to ASME codes. Can't remember an expiration date ever being part of the process. Also did due diligence on a manufacturer of air compressors and then worked in a tool group that included a compressor manufacturer (not the same one). To my knowledge, no expiration dates there.
Hgh pressure dive tanks have an expiration date, that is they have to be visually inspected periodically and then hydrostatically tested periodically or their certification "expires". If they don't pass either one, they are not returned to you. They are dangerous when worn, but normally take 2000 psi or greater.
As far as failure mode on a 125-150 psi working pressure tank, if rust occurs internally then it may cause a slow leak that will get worse until the tank won't hold any more, but not catasrophic. I have seen a poorly seated drain coupling blow out with force but towards the floor.
Frank
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