Coffee Bean

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No experience working with it, but there's one growing in the front yard. Had a tree guy out to thin out some stuff a few years ago, and he pointed out two trees on the property that are rare around here. One was the Kentucky Coffee Tree, and the other a Mimosa. I thought the first was a locust or some such - a weed, and the other I couldn't see for the vines growing all over it. Now they're my two favorite trees. It's funny how someone telling you you have something rare tends to make you value it more. Kind of like the Antiques Roadshow, but in wood. ;)
R
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"RonB" > 8 to 10" long. Widest is about 12". It has an attractive Oak or Ash-

I have worked several pieces with Kentucky Coffee Tree. It works like walnut and has a bit of chatoyance. Its a nice light rose tone untill oil finish touches it, then it resmbles red oak in color.
I used water base urethane with no stain and the wood kept the slightly rosey hue. Very nice.
Kentucky Coffee Tree is the state tree in Kentucky. The leaves and beans strongly resemble Catalpa.
Jim in the Bluegrass
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On 11/10/2011 9:40 PM, Jim wrote:

??????? a bit of chatoyance ??????
I don't understand when used as a property of wood, would you please explain what you mean.
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On Fri, 11 Nov 2011 08:44:01 -0500, k-nuttle

It describes wood that reflects light differently when viewed from various angles. See:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
÷ggJD7Tjgs
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 11/11/2011 9:06 AM, Nova wrote:

Thanks. While I had seen the property in wood, I had always thought that the word referred to property of jewelry stones, and the like.
I guess someone old can learn some thing new.
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Jack wrote:>

Yup. Chatoyance causes the "Star" in rubies and emeralds.
I believe iridescense describes the color changes on the neck feathers of blackbirds, as an example.
Jim in KY
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