Cleaning router bits

What can I use to clean the gum/junk off my router bits. I've seen something in one of the catalogs (can't find it now), but surely there's something I can pick up at Home Depot. I've tried minerial spirits and acetone, but they don't work very well.
Thanks in advance for the help.
Rick
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If its the same pitch and/or gum one finds on sawblades, I've had good luck using a full-strength mixture of Simple Green cleaner. Just soak the bits in the stuff for a few hours and the pitch wipes right off. I usual spray the cleaned blades with WD40 before storing them. Don't see why SG wouldn't work on router bits too.
Good luck

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Oven cleaner is fast!!!!! Just rinse with water when you are finished to remove the residue. max

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On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:05:28 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@NoSpam.Net wrote:

Loads of things. Most are hard to find, except in large quantities. I have cyclohexane on hand in the workshop because it's a useful wax solvent too (bit flammable - be careful how you store it). This is what I usually reach for when acetone won't shift things.
Two that are easily found are car-parts shop "carb cleaner" and "brake cleaner". The contents may vary, so read the tins. Generally carb cleaner does a better job at shifting cooked varnishes, but brake cleaner leaves no residue.
--
Smert' spamionam

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What about oven cleaner? I have a can of tar/gum remover for saw blades, router bits, etc. and it looks / smells / acts just like oven clearner. When this ran out, I was going to just try oven cleaner.
snipped-for-privacy@NoSpam.Net wrote:

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It's been said and written that the manufacturers frown on over cleaner -- that it *may* loosen the carbide. Whether this is like PVC and Dust Collector explosions, or not - I have no idea.
I use Simple Green - and all it takes for my blades and bits is a couple of minutes followed by a scrub then rinse. No idea why other folks (and Wood magazine) need to soak their blades for hours. Maybe since I clean mine every other month, it takes less time.
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It's only available in Canada, probably because of shipping regulations, but there should be the equivalent of Lee Valley Tools resin cleaner in the US.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?SID=&ccurrency=1&page0062&category=1,41080,41162
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Soak in Simple Green, then use a brass brush to scrub off the crud
John
On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:05:28 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@NoSpam.Net wrote:

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I read a review in the Oct 2004 issue of Wood magazine. They reviewed a number of products and found a product called Empire Blade Saver the best. I bought some and I have been very happy with it. I did not clean router bits but a very gummy saw blade. Look on www.empiremfg.com for info on where to buy this product. \ \In the Wood magazine article they gave a warning about cleaning router bits which have a router bit bearing. The cleaner can remove the lubrication from the bearing. They recommend removing the bearing, cleaning the bit, and then reinstalling the bearing and treating it with a high-speed router-bearing lubricant.
Dick Snyder
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If you want something that is easy on your hands, actually works and works fast, safe for the environment and was developed specifically for cleaning bits, CMT Formula 2050. It will generally clean a bit with a wipe of a rag almost instantly and a little goes a long way.
http://www.cmtrouterbits.com/catalog/cmtfor2050.htm
or I pay $9.99 at www.wwhardware.com

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snipped-for-privacy@NoSpam.Net wrote:

heard that Simple Green works too but I have never tried it. Oven cleaner cleans gummed up blades and bits but you must be careful to remove all residue. There is some concern that oven cleaner may attach brazed carbide cutters but I have read from reputable blade folks that oven cleaner works just fine.
Philski
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wrote:

We recommend oven cleaner. It is easy, fast, very effective and everyone knows to be careful with it. It does affect the braze alloy slightly however the effect is not important on a practical level. It is sort of like trying to lose weight by having your hair cut.
Caustic cleaners have been the industry standard in top end saw shops for better than twenty years.
We have several pages on this on our website at www.carbideprocessors.com
Tom Walz
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I WD 40 mine, keeps em slick for storage, too.
TSP -90 else. sodium sulfate, same as washing, I think.
wrote:

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I suspected as much myself, but it was only a suspicion.

Thanks for weighing in on this.
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five minutes, and rinse the crud off.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Try EasyOff oven cleaner. It works for me.
wrote:

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Washing soda is cheaper and less hazardous (EasyOff = lye in a spray can).
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 08:05:28 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@NoSpam.Net wrote:

Oven cleaner ($1 a can) works better than mineral spirits. I soak the bits for 15 minutes, lightly brush (with a toothbrush), rinse, dry, and spray with WD-40 to prevent rusting.
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Almost forgot I put this post up.
Thanks all for the replys.
Rick
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I used EasyOff. Worked great. Careful that stuff is caustic!
Again thanks to all, Rick
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