Cleaning new saw

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On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 20:59:38 GMT, "deadlock" <nobody@nowhere_yes_its a_cliche.com> wrote:

As a guy who sells this in a bike shop, I suggest kerosene or the $6 / gallon citrus degreaser from the Borg, vs. the $6 1/2 liter from the bike shop.
Even _the bike_ shop dosen't use that in it's own parts washer. <G>
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cheap as possible. I bought some to degrease some old thrift shop brace augers once, worked like a you-know-what, quite well. They came in an old cardboard can with a metal screw on cap and they were caked with grease and dirt. Once done, rinse and dry.

--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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most households have oven cleaner on had - give it a go.
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Bill D wrote:

Then rinse it off with lots of water. Be sure to rinse off all the dissolved paint too.
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Cap'n 321 wrote:

Can you find diesel fuel or heating oil? They are essentially kerosene with different tax schemes attached. As far as that goes, you can also use Jet-A.
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE
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Mineral spirits.
Don Dando

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Got my new Delta delivered and need to clean the gunk off the tables. Delta says use kerosene and specifically says not to use gasoline or acetone. Finding kerosene is a pain in the butt. Any ideas?
Diesel will work just as well.
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Sailaway wrote: > Got my new Delta delivered and need to clean the gunk off the tables. > Delta says use kerosene and specifically says not to use gasoline or > acetone. Finding kerosene is a pain in the butt. Any ideas?
Lamp Oil.
Lew
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Get some diesel fuel. Close enough that you'd never know the difference. WD 40 also works. BTW, kerosene is easily available in most of the civilized word. How hard did you look?

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Places like Tucson with very little winter have a limited number of sources. As far as I am aware, there are two places one can get kerosene here, one place here wanted to charge $8/gallon for a pail of kerosene last winter. My normal supplier is much more reasonable but they only carry kerosene during the winter months and in limited supply.

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Standard lantern and camp stove fuel. In Arizona? Got to be everywhere. In any case, diesel is available.

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Never said diesel won't work. Was only responding to the blanket statement that "kerosene is easily available in most of the civilized world". Despite my occasional protestations that Tucson may not be part of the civilized world, my comment was meant to point out that kerosene (in and of itself as a product sold as "kerosene", not lantern nor camp stove fuel) is not necessarily easily available all over. Also, isn't camp stove fuel really white gasoline? Not necessarily something to be using as a solvent.

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I'd be willing to bet that I could take a flight to Tucson, and, upon ariving, I could find kerosene withing 1 hour.
wrote:
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[Top posting fixed]

[sigh] As you could note in my original post on this topic, I indicated that, as best I have been able to find, there are *two* sources for kerosene in Tucson. One of them is obscenely expensive, the second carries it as a seasonal item. I didn't say it was impossible to find, only that it was not as readily available as some alternatives.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Most of us don't have a clue what all these different fractions are or how they differ. But just because something doesn't say it is kerosene, doesn't mean it isn't kerosene or the next best thing. They don't call wick type lanterns kerosene lamps because they burn whale oil. Yuppie lamps still use kerosene, they just put colors and smells into it.
I don't know what camp stove fuel is but it acts just like lighter fluid, excellent for removing gunky labels. It is not what we use to buy as "white gas" which, near as I can tell, is regular gasoline without the coloring and without the lead. Not too cool to burn gasoline with lead in it in a camp stove. Course camp fuel will also work in a gasoline stove. In any case, the camp fuel I've bought does not act exactly like gasoline which is less viscous and evaporates faster.
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All that money wasted on printing labels and warnings.
Suppose you and CW could get together over a cigar and discuss the difference in volatility and flash point between kerosene and camp stove fuel?
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George wrote:

Don't normally take warning labels off but I sure remove price labels, especially the on every piece of plastic pipe where a fitting would go.

Nope, don't like cigars, quit smoking over 25 years ago, don't care if they do smoke, but assume they have no selfcontrol and don't mind the stink. Oh, and I really don't care about volatility and flash point of kerosene and camp stove, just know they are not quite the same thing.
Personally, I'd already have that saw outside, washed with gasoline, good antirust coating added, and in the shop cutting wood. Beats climbing around in trees cutting limbs, like I did today.
Course if I was really gung-ho I'd be down at HF buying a lathe and trying my hand and making some bowls with the Amur Cork tree wood I cut today. But, I've never turned anything so...........

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CW wrote:
> BTW, kerosene is easily available in most of the civilized > word. How hard did you look?
You will play hell trying to find kero in SoCal.
It's an air quality issue.
Lew
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Got diesel? In any case, I did specify the civilized world.

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I am in socal, and it's everywhere. Cheap too. But it's in any standard little hardware store, in those two tone rectangular cans, like dirty yellow and white colored. I think it costs around $2.99 a quart or so.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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