Cleanin drawer slides

I am working on a project using 14 sets of Knape & Vogt KV8405 drawer slides. Because of limited shop space I temporarily stored a section of my project on my covered patio. Unfortunately we had a dust/sandstorm and the slides accumulated a lot of sand in the grease on the slides. What do you suggest as the most efficient way to remove the sand and what should I use to lubricate the slides after I have cleaned them?
Thanks Rob
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A solvent that will turn the grease to oil and flush it away - WD-40 would do it - then re-grease once clean. Flush and blow with air.
Martin
On 5/26/2012 6:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@kitrager.com wrote:

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On 5/26/2012 6:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@kitrager.com wrote:

Disassemble and use
Brake Cleaner from your local automotive store, use the plastic tube to direct the spray.
A very small dab of lithium grease on the bearings
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On Sun, 27 May 2012 07:51:14 -0600, Leon wrote

Don't use any heavy duty solvents if there are any plastic parts on the slides! (such as the bearing retainers, bump stops, etc)
-BR
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On 5/27/2012 9:34 AM, Bruce wrote:

Bingo! And these plastic parts, particularly the ball bearing retainers, are the first to fail over time, making the slides completely useless.
Be very careful using any solvent that will cause these plastic parts too fail before their time.
I think I would FIRST use our old army rifle cleaning trick of using very hot water (not necessarily boiling) to wash out both the sand and the existing grease before re-lubricating the slides.
I'm actually here to tell you this, due in large part, and only because this method indeed works ... if you get my drift. :)
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On 5/27/2012 11:28 AM, Swingman wrote:

FWIT Brake cleaner not to be confused with brake fluid, typically is a non threat for rubber and plastic. There are lots of those type parts in brake drum and disk brakes systems.
Brake fluid will do a decent job cleaning also but will melt paint in an instant.
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On 5/27/2012 9:34 AM, Bruce wrote:

I was thinking and for some reason left out, "white" lithium grease.
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On 5/26/2012 7:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@kitrager.com wrote:

I would be tempted to just put them in the dishwasher and run them through a short cycle with normal detergent. After they are dry they will need to be lubricated. If you are worried about type I'd ask the maker what they recommend, otherwise I'd just use a bit of lithium or silicone grease.
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On 5/26/2012 5:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@kitrager.com wrote:

Simple Green and hot water. For lube I would use a food grade silicone grease (spray can with tube to direct the spray)
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