chisels

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Dave in Fairfax wrote:

They say the first step to recovery is realizing you have a problem. ;-)

That's a nice fish. Is there any truth to the rumor that they grow that big because they feed on the Yooper dragonfl ... er ... mosquitoes? :-)

I'm guessing you weren't just vacationing in Guam, eh?
Chuck Vance
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Conan The Librarian wrote:

Strangely enough I was in the employ of our Navy. %-) Got to see the world and everything. The only problem with the bass catching the skeetrs is sometimes the fish goes up and doesn't come back down. It is a pleasurable addiction, and less costly than some. Least as long as I remain a bottom feeder. Unless I hit the lotto big, I don't see that as changing anytime soon. %-(
Dave in Fairfax
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Dave in Fairfax wrote:

Ah yes ... it's not just an adventure, it's a job.

At least you live in an area where there's a chance to bottom-feed. Down hyar in oletoolhail they seem to think that the older and rustier a tool is, the more it's worth ... as a decoration for your "kuntry kitchen". :-|
Chuck Vance
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Conan The Librarian wrote:

I go up to NY and through PA fairly frequently. If you have something in mind, I'll keep an eye open. Send me a cell or other phone number and a price range and if I see it, I'll give you a call and tell you what I'm looking at. You decide whether you want it or not. Better send the info OFF-line. %-)
Dave in Fairfax
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Dave in Fairfax wrote:

No kidding. :-) Thanks for the offer. I'll take you up on it the next time I'm in the market. For now though, before adding to my ... er ... "arsenal", I need to consider selling some of the stuff I've got that's sitting unused.
Chuck Vance (not a collector, no sir)
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Conan The Librarian wrote:

I'll be going up to Philly end of August-beginning of September. I was planning on making a 2 1/2 hr trip into a 6 or 7 hour trip, by looking for tools, let me know. Not collecting them, mind you, just shopping for things to use. %-)
Dve in Fairfax
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On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 10:13:16 -0500, Conan The Librarian

Didya ever cozy up with a copy of "Fishing Bamboo", by Gierach?
Nice little book.
(watson - who could stand a good bamboo rod building thread.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
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On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 18:26:36 -0400, the opaque Tom Watson

What kind? Would that be a cotton (mercerized or not), linen, polyester, or nylon thread, Tawm? <groan>
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Tom Watson wrote:

I've got several of Gierach's books, but not the one on bamboo. Unfortunately, I haven't had the honor of fishing 'boo. Given my neo-Luddite leanings, I'm guessing I would like it. :-)

You go first. :-)
Chuck Vance (all I know about building 'boo rods is you need a planing form ... and a L-N block with the special rodmakers groove)
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Conan The Librarian wrote:

Possibly the frog design is the second of the four designs described here:

Contrary to what Mr Leach says, that frog design has a bad reputation. It is flexible enough that the cutter can take a nose-dive when you hit tough spot in the wood.

My guess would be that the face of the frog on which the cutter rests is not flat, or the problem with the lever cap screw causes it to bear down harder on one side of the cap iron.
I ALWAYS have that problem with wedged planes.
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Yeah that's exactly it. Second from the left. The seller told me it is a type 8 as he was reading from the Walters book in his email to me, I confirmed it online: http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/dating / It is a "B" casting with no maker's name anywhere besides "No 6" on the toe.

I didn't experience that when planing doug fir and its many knots but it is not a very hard wood. I kept the screws nice and tight.

Actually I cannot tell too well by looking at it, other than that it is perfectly flat. I imagined it is some misalignment of mounting to the reciever... very hard to see. But I did notice some kind of indiscernible skew there. It is like a rise that causes it at an odd angle, I wouldn't know how to fettle it because everything is much too slight.
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gregj wrote:

an older Stanley, they've got themselves a workable plane.
Dave
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Goodie, goodie; I found a Stanley No. 4 some months back in the garage of my wife's elderly cousin who had passed away. I have (this very day) begun trying to tune it up using my new DMT DuoSharp. The Craftsman "Jack Plane" I bought 30 years ago (when I knew even less than I now know), and used practically nil, is a virtual copy of it. I 'spose I should try to tune that one, too.
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You should get to a junk shop and buy a rectangle or shelf of thick glass and get some Norton AO papers of 100 and 220 grit and a can of 3m super 77. This also leads to the scary sharp method.
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Can do that as well; I already gots the glass and paper. Thanks for the $.02.
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Look for Stanley 720 or 750 chisels, and potentially turning your own replacement handles.
Or get out the crowbar, and order a set of Lie Nielsen reproductions.
Patriarch
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I recommend Stubai. Read the review on the Diefenbacher website, as I own a set I entirely agree with it. They hold the edge well, when I am slamming (!) the blade into doug fir using a beech mallet, they do not take niks in the cutting edge.
I have sharpened the Stubais side by side with a Bahco/Sandvik (lots on eBay) on Norton yellow 220 A/O and the Stuabi leaves a light grey dust, a fast and easy to attain edge that is glass_smooth_razor_sharp. Perfect quality steel.
The Sandvik (Sweden) leaves it very dark and "gummy" (so to speak) and a harder to attain, not_as_good edge. These equalize with the cheap chrome vanadium chisels from woodworker's supply, a set of which I have (blue plastic handles, super cheap).
I have new Buck bros. chisels (hickory handles with leather tops) that are a better steel that the Sandviks but they are RC 59 and did take some niks, not hard enough. When sharpening, they leave a non gummy color that is merely darker than the Stubais, but a powder and not as dark as the Sandvik.
Other folks in here recommend Two Cherries (a TON!), lots of hard work to flatten the backs from too much machine polishing.
Stuabi are cheaper and just as worth it: http://www.diefenbacher.com / made Austria, very flat backs. Don't let the low price fool you.
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I must be the only one who is getting good service out of my Marples blue-handles. I got five of 'em for about $85.00. They don't keep an edge forever, but it's a while between sharpenings. They take an edge pretty easy.
Marples are, OK.
Not great. But OK.
Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@pobox.com wrote:

level of quality.
Dave
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Yep Dave, vintage is definately the answer with Marples. My best chisels came from a junk shop, about $2 each. Gave them a new handle and, after cleaning off the rust, I could clearly make out the trade mark (new chisels don't have a maker's mark). They hold a fantastic edge and I would never swap them for a new set.
Cheers Bill D
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