Cherry trim staining

Greetings All, I'm hoping to use cherry for casings on my doors and windows along with the baseboard. We have cherry kitchen cabinets, matching flooring, so a little continuity woud be nice. I realize this will be costly, having just come from a hardwood supplier. I like the style of trim that I saw in one of the home improvement mags a few years ago and would like to do the same here. My first question is since the windows are made from pine and the jambs are white pine, is it realistic to try staining the windows to match the cherry trim? I know how unevenly pine takes stain, although wood conditioner does help somewhat. What do others do when working with different species that need to lok as similar as possible? Would a gel type stain work better with these porous woods?
Secondly, to do this project, I will need a fair amount of 3/4 x 3 1/2 cherry. The supplier had a lot of 4/4 x 6, which would cause me to make a lot of scrap. If I could buy 4/4 x 4, that would be ideal. Is looking into online lumber suppliers worthwhile? I guess the downside is not being able to screen the boards beforehand. Are the prices this way cheap enough to offset the high scrap? Hope this makes sense.... TIA, Mark
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There's a small upcharge for 8"+ widths. Some places (Hearne Hardwoods is one) will UPS smaller orders. Add it together, though, it's about the same 40% waste. Maybe get creative with the skinny sticks?
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mark wrote:

Skip the match, and work towards a color that will be complementary. Both the stained wood and the cherry will change over time, so any luck of a match will be temporary.

Order S4S 3/4" x 3 1/2" wood from your local wood dealer. You'll probably pay by the linear foot, vs. board foot, but you'll save a bunch of time and waste less.
Trust me, jointing and thicknessing gets old fast when doing lots of trim. Trim length boards are more difficult to joint and rip than typical furniture parts. Let the mill use the big, efficient machines they have to make your job easier.
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DW735, etc....
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mark wrote:

Have fun jointing and ripping 8, 10, and 12 foot boards!
I have a DJ-20, too... <G>
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I have a DJ-20 too (Thanks for the tip Barry). Guess he will need his wife's help with the 10 & 12 footers. <G>
Jerry
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Ahhhh.... once again a voice of experience is heard.
I usually tell my clients (even with some paints) "it will get close, but not match. Even if it matches now, it may not match in just a few months. So rather than have an 'almost' match that looks bad, let's pick a color that makes it look like we did it on purpose".
It saves us both grief.
Robert
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