Cherry/Lacewood Side Table

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On 7/3/2013 4:18 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

lower the blade the fewer exposed teeth. It is the pinching at the back of the blade that starts the dangerous situation, the reason the riving knife is used to help prevent that.
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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

"Leon" wrote:

SFWIW, Cerritos College teaches:
TS blade exposure = material thickness being cut + max gullet depth + 1/2".
Designed to minimize injury damage.
(Need to give the surgeon something to sew back together)
A riving knife is worth it's weight in gold when it comes to preventing kick back IMHO.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Just curious whether anyone can validate Lew's technnique. It's more blade exposure than I would have thought required.
Bill

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http://lumberjocks.com/topics/11838
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On 7/4/2013 1:30 AM, Bill wrote:

For me it makes sense to cool the carbide. It also makes sense that cutting down will cause less kick back than cutting into the wood.
if for some reason you veer from the fence, you cause a bind (slight) but the teeth are pushing toward you. When the blade is high, they are pushing toward the table top.
Take a look at Brian's cuts, see the burning. Too low, so Brian prides himself on a good setup and is still burning. So either he is moving too slow or he has the blade too low.. or both..
BTW why is having the blade low safe??? you can barely see it.. you may not cut all the way through a finger, but it can cut you good, and it can kickback more easily. So why is it safer...
All of this is what I find better, you may find something else. That's fine...
--
Jeff

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On 7/4/2013 9:23 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Or cutting Cherry! It is tough not to burn cherry.
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On 7/4/2013 12:05 AM, Bill wrote:

Industrial text (don't recall it's pedigree/author/publisher otomh and it's not handy to look) was taught from "back in the day" at uni industrial shop was "gullet plus a little" -- anything more wasn't of value re: kickback and adds to the likelihood of accidental contact.
Pretty similar although a full half-inch above clearing gullet height would have been considered more than a little--more like quarter/maybe 3/8" would have been approved of...
Research I'm unaware of; I'd wager these ad hoc rules came from practical application rather than any research specifically designed for the purpose.
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On 7/4/2013 12:05 AM, Bill wrote:

Use the height you are most comfortable. You can get a kick back any time you are cutting wood on a TS. The only written suggestion that I have seen was by Systematic, IIRC it suggested that the bottom of the gullet should be just above the top of the wood.
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Addendum:
Should read:
TS blade exposure = material thickness being cut + max gullet depth + 1/2" MAX.
I need an editor, especially late at night.
Lew ---------------------------------------------------------

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On 7/3/2013 11:18 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Snip I felt it was over the top in terms of harshness (is that a word?)
As much and as valid of a word as functionality and or utilization. All can be used in their more simple form with the same meaning.
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On Sun, 30 Jun 2013 18:17:05 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Well, let the flames begin, but Brian, that design is one of the most unimaginative, soul-less designs I've ever seen. Now please don't take this personally because your workmanship is impeccable as is your choice of woods, but they are both wasted on this high school woodshop project.
t
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On Monday, July 1, 2013 4:22:06 PM UTC-4, tommyboy wrote:

While I don't agree with you, you must keep in mind that this project was d one as a build-a-long for my viewers. While I think the piece is beautiful as is and doesn't need extra embellishment, I didn't want to add extra fea tures that might be outside of the skill level of some of the build-a-long participants.
Everyone has their own taste as to what they find appealing in a piece of f urniture. I'm sure you could have expressed your taste and dislikes w/o ac tually sounding like a high-school'er in the process, but you chose not to and thus your comments reflect more on your character than on my craftsmans hip. The random mindless/thoughtless comment are what I've come to expect at the wrec so no harm done.
Cheers, BG

For info on the build-a-long go here: http://www.garagewoodworks.com/Forum/showthread.php?tid &5
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Tommy Boy,
Flames? Let me be the first. Apparently you have no fricking taste at all. This project is a classic, stickley-esque presentation of beautiful wood, e xcellently executed. This is soul-less? You are soul-less apparently lookin g only for beauty is some over adorned and tortured application of all that is complex.
Simplicity is beauty. I typically hate mixed-species wood projects. Walnut breadboards on a cherry table top make me puke. What we have here is an int elligent combination of Lace and Cherry, beautiful, simple lines, classic d ovetails, utilitarian yet beautiful wood pull.
It really is a shame you can't see how beautifully simple and simply beauti ful this piece is.
Can you please point us to the multiple pages of project pictures that you have that shows some of your imaginative and soul-full designs.
By the way, simple lives for ever in design. Other descriptions of imaginat ive and soul-full designs might be "trendy" "cliche" "crap", "WTF?", etc.
From one of my heros... But it is true that oak, ash and elm properly treated, possess attractions that yield to those of no other woods. The undulations of their grain, the soft unobtrusive tones which they assume through skillful polish, the color -play which runs over their smooth surface are qualities which to be apprec iated need only to be fairly observed. Gustave Stickley The Craftsman, Vol. 1, NO. 1, 1901
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On 7/1/2013 3:22 PM, tommyboy wrote:

Could you show us some examples of your work?
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wrote:

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wrote:

Yes I could. A.B.P.W.
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On 7/2/2013 8:58 AM, tommyboy wrote:

Yeah! Saw them, thanks, very nice!
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On Tuesday, July 2, 2013 9:58:25 AM UTC-4, tommyboy wrote:

Let me start. By the way I hope these aren't your best pieces.
Your chair with the scrollsaw work is very high-school woodshop. The patte rn you chose is very boreing and unimaginative. It has no sole. It looks v ery 2-dimensional with the straight faced sides and rails. The two species rail used in the headrest looks badly out of place. The cushion fabric make s me want to vomit. There is nothing special about it.
Very poor grain match in the carved chair back rail. It's very distracting. The arm resets look like they'd be very uncomfortable the way they jet upw ards. The legs are too thin for the piece and don't fit with the scale. Th ey look like they are ready to snap.
The crib is extremely country - not my taste at all. Very boring and unima ginative. There is absolutely nothing special about this piece either. Th e turnings are very dry and you also have a few that have bad color match.
This was the best you could offer to demonstrate your sole-full and imagina tive workmanship? LOL Son, I am your Yoda Master if this is your best work. Now have a seat.
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On Tue, 2 Jul 2013 07:38:10 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Hahahahaha!
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On Tue, 2 Jul 2013 07:38:10 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Sounds as though you're describing your own work..............
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