Cherry/Lacewood Side Table

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On 7/3/2013 1:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Well in all honesty, I use a tilt box to verify that the positive stops are accurate with in .1 degrees and my rips produce square edges good enough for glue up. This was true for my old Jet cabinet saw and my new ICS SawStop.

Well I will agree that many do but that is all in learning how to set the saw up so that you can trust its settings and stops. Personally I despise using chamfer bits on my router table. Too much set up time vs, tilting my blade.
I understand your concerns, been there and done that, but I have quite a bit more experience than you and have learned over the years what works better and how to work efficiently.
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On Wednesday, July 3, 2013 2:32:11 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

Which is exactly why I didn't use a chamfer bit. Tilting the router fence and using a straight bit is much faster (In my experience) than tilting and re-aligning a fence. And an insignificant point to pick on. Agree?

You are incredibly hung up on "experience". That's twice you've used this one.
As a Ph.D. chemist I have met some incredibly bad chemists that had more "experience" than me. And I have met M.S. level chemists that have rocked my world. It's meaningless and arbitrary and I don't understand your attraction to it.
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On 7/3/2013 1:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

LOL, I hope you meant to say,
Tilting the router fence and using a straight bit is much faster (In my experience) than tilting and re-aligning a "blade".
We work with the methods that we get the best results. I have been down the road you are going. You will be a much better woodworker because of that, years down the road. You experiment, you learn. You obviously put a great deal of thought into your tilting router fence. You see value in using the fence that way. We were just kicking around different methods of how we would have done some things differently, you can learn from that. Perhaps you will realize What tolerances are acceptable/noticeable and which are not. Some times being AR gets in the way of efficiency, I am an expert on that. ;~)
Swingman and have built several kitchen in the past. In his shop he cuts dado's in the backs of the rails and stiles for the face frames and assembles the face frames. In my I cut the panels from the sheet goods which will fit into those dado's in the back of the face frames, and the sheet goods get dado's also. Eventually we bring all of the face frames and cabinets panels together and assemble the cabinets. We have to trust out machinery for the parts to fit perfectly every time. So in that example being equally AR is a good thing. ;~)
Keep the imagination going! When I was 19 years old I had been interested in wood working for half my life. I was self taught and at that age designed and build a "contraption" that had a back fence to place my wood against and it had an adjustable height moveable fence that pivoted 180 degrees. The adjustable fence sat on top of the wood and acted as a guide for my circular saw. Basically I was trying to duplicate how a RAS operated. It worked great. That was 1974, long before SCMS existed.
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On Wednesday, July 3, 2013 3:10:45 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

nce and using a straight bit is much faster (In my experience) than tilting and re-aligning a fence. And an insignificant point to pick on. Agree?


Yes. I caught it after I hit send.
I'm going to end this here, unless someone really provokes me :) and say th at the reason that I keep coming back to the wrec. (around 9-10 years ago I started posting - yeah!) is because I value yours, Swingman's and a few o ther's input. I should have ignored the mud throwing (which in my opinion w asn't constructive criticism or useful in any way - maybe I should have bee n more specific?).
I'll be back! :)






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snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

You have a doctoral degree in chemistry and you sought donations (here) to buy a video camera for your web site? Gee, that's pretty close to "deception by omission".
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On Wednesday, July 3, 2013 4:43:07 PM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

I suppose it wouldn't make a difference if you knew I've been out of work since last December eh?
Go lick a boot.
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On 7/3/2013 2:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Brian, a router bit will not cut like a TS will. it will leave scallops, while a really nice blade (Forrest) will leave a finished edge.
I would tilt my blade too, rather than hold my panel like you are doing.
BTW it takes me a few minutes to tilt my TS blade, I have a contractor table saw so I need to remove my baffles at the back... but I prefer that to other methods.. it's why I bought a TILTING ARBOR saw in the first place..
--
Jeff

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On Wednesday, July 3, 2013 12:59:16 PM UTC-4, woodchucker wrote:

r

ticism)

my boy, who had actually encouraged me to do so with his comment about expe cting flames for his post. Maybe I encouraged Garage boy by coming down on his side, which isn't always the case, I have trashed his stuff before as w ell.

elt it was over the top in terms of harshness (is that a word?)and more den igrating than necessary so I jumped in to provide some defense, assuming G arage boy would likely not.

der) and I loved Sam Maloof, he was a sweet and talented man and I learned a few things from him over the years but I have no love for that swoopy des ign type stuff so likely would be unimpressed.

Donkey sh*t. You judge "what went into it" based on your taste.

I am confident that he presented what was his hand picked favorites. I foun d them to be weak and uninspiring. His best of the bunch was the Maloof kn ock-off chair but this didn't demonstrate the very trait that he crapped on me for. Being "unimaginative".


Now were getting somewhere. Actual useful criticism.
Could you point out the board you find distracting? Below is a picture of t he top:
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/pictures/side_table/002.jpg

What pattern?


Again, useful criticism. Could you point out the videos and time frame whe re a board "lifted"? I remember a piece of ply lifting a little but nothin g dramatic.


A blade too low leads to kickback? That's news to me.

A blade that is excessively high is more dangerous than one that is too low (but still cuts all the way through).
Could you elaborate here?

Finally a complement (I think). Thank you :)

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On 7/3/2013 12:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

To easily understand, you would need to repost the original picture, the one that this link has replaced. But it shows up better in the first video opening shot below.
The right middle top board here.
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/video.php?video=v91
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On Wednesday, July 3, 2013 2:17:39 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

per

riticism)

ommy boy, who had actually encouraged me to do so with his comment about ex pecting flames for his post. Maybe I encouraged Garage boy by coming down o n his side, which isn't always the case, I have trashed his stuff before as well.

felt it was over the top in terms of harshness (is that a word?)and more d enigrating than necessary so I jumped in to provide some defense, assuming Garage boy would likely not.

eader) and I loved Sam Maloof, he was a sweet and talented man and I learne d a few things from him over the years but I have no love for that swoopy d esign type stuff so likely would be unimpressed.

found them to be weak and uninspiring. His best of the bunch was the Maloo f knock-off chair but this didn't demonstrate the very trait that he crappe d on me for. Being "unimaginative".

ce

of the top:


Like I told you when you originally asked - it was an artifact of the photo graphy.
Nothing wrong with the top. It is very pleasing to look at.

It's all in how the light hits the wood. It is a very pleasing top to look at.

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On 7/3/2013 1:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

I am sure it looks great but that first picture was not as flattering as the current.
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On Wednesday, July 3, 2013 2:34:47 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

emper

criticism)

Tommy boy, who had actually encouraged me to do so with his comment about expecting flames for his post. Maybe I encouraged Garage boy by coming down on his side, which isn't always the case, I have trashed his stuff before as well.

I felt it was over the top in terms of harshness (is that a word?)and more denigrating than necessary so I jumped in to provide some defense, assumi ng Garage boy would likely not.

reader) and I loved Sam Maloof, he was a sweet and talented man and I lear ned a few things from him over the years but I have no love for that swoopy design type stuff so likely would be unimpressed.

s

I found them to be weak and uninspiring. His best of the bunch was the Mal oof knock-off chair but this didn't demonstrate the very trait that he crap ped on me for. Being "unimaginative".

ince

e of the top:

he

hotography.

look at.


I have a few of myself that are like that.
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On 7/3/2013 1:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Snip

LOL... Do you recall the first time I think I pissed you off? ;~)
You wee proudly showing off one of your earlier projects and along side the project there you stood. I asked if your wife insisted on you being in the shot. LOL
To this day I hate being in pictures of my finished work. I want the audience to focus on what is important in the picture.
Now having said that, about 18 months ago Nailshooter, Swingman and their significant others were at our house visiting at Christmas time. Nailshooter took what I considered an embarrassing number of detailed, up close, and personal pictures of the "big pantry cabinet" that I had just completed. He insisted in me being in one of those pictures.
And now that I have mentioned this and if he sees this post I can probably expect to see him post that picture. ;~(
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There is the famous Leon Fat Ass Sag Test, LFAST. I understand that you volunteered your wife for that test, but she refused. I thought it was epic. A simple test. Will it hold me up? If so, it will not sag under anything I place on this shelf. You can't get more basic (and pragmatic) than that!
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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

There is no proof that my face is on the other side of that "ass"! LOL
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Why wait? Post it yourself and you can control the initial caption that comes with the image. :)
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On Wed, 3 Jul 2013 11:22:16 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

To your eye, but not mine the lacewoods grain is way to busy for my tastes.
Mark
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On 7/3/2013 12:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

...

It's not an individual board, it's that the four don't go together well--there's too much difference in color and grain pattern between each such that the juxtaposition is distracting.
It looks as though it were two boards and that you put one on the to edges and the other in the middle two. W/o more material from either of the two selections to try to match, I'd have probably veneered the top from the board that is the two outers and, perhaps, laid it as an inset panel framed by the cherry or some other way to even out the disparity that shows up as is...

The continuity of similar grain/color from one piece to the next as discussed above...
...

...
I think other than the above on better grain-matching it would have been improved if it were made to look a little "lighter" on its feet--it seems a little heavy to me.
I'd have tapered the legs a little more and certainly have lightened-up the edges of the top by at least a chamfer if not actually thinning the edge by a bottom taper or using a fully-shaped edge. The hard square corners are a kick in the eyes, too, imo.
While on grain, quarter-sawn material for the legs would eliminate the different grain pattern shown on the front and front rear legs--the rear one looks as though it is close from what can tell; the front has face on one side, edge on the other that doesn't match well...
Tage Frid's first book (and I think it's also in Hoadley's) has a good demo of choosing grain direction for legs to make them nearly symmetric from each side...
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On 7/3/2013 1:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

That shot shows the top much better, the head on view looked like the grain was so vastly different that it did not belong.
I now agree that it looks better.

I also see what I consider poor machining on the jointer. I press down on the front of the board, and once I have enough room, both paddles are on the front, one overlaps the blade the other well in front. I never push from the back that way.
If you look you will see it (TS ).

--
Jeff

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Kickback occurs when for some reason the leading edge or underside of the b oard catches a tooth on the blade. This can be caused by the wood pinching between the bade and fence for various reasons such as bad feed method, str essed wood, expanding wood from blade heat, etc. If the blade is low it is easier for the rising wood to get over top of the blade and missile into yo ur crotch in a literal millisecond, maybe bringing a few fingers along with it if your real unlucky.
Yes a higher blade is safer in terms of avoiding kickback but has other dan gers if you don't have a proper guard system, etc.
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