Can you give me some help on making this angle cut?

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I am making a vanity to replace on in my vacation house. The current vanity has an odd shape so that it can fit in a tight space. If you look here you will see three pictures. Please look and then I will tell you the help I need:
http://picasaweb.google.com/dicksnyder/VANITYPIX?authkey=Gv1sRgCMiypvXqjZ7mHg #
I want to make a new vanity to have the same shape as the current vanity as seen in the plan view which is in Picture 2. You see an odd shape on one end. That was done to fit the vanity in a narrow space while still having it deep enough. The two angles on the odd piece are 45 degrees each.
Now my question. I want to put a 22.5 degree angle on the adjoining faces of the two pieces of the face frame as shown in picture 1. I did the narrow face frame (the right one in the picture) easily on my table saw. However, the wider face frame it too wide to fit on my table saw between the blade and the fence. My idea was to do it on my jointer but I need a firm piece to put up against the tilted jointer fence. It is unstable if I do it as is. My one idea is to use some double stick tape to affix the face frame to a solid piece of wood so I can keep the face frame tightly against the fence (the backer board would actually against the fence with the face frame on the front of the backer board). Does anyone have a better idea?
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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Dick Snyder wrote:

What you've described should work with careful set-up.
I'd be inclined to use a 22.5-degree camfer bit in my router with a straight guide because I'd be more confident in being able to cut the angle exactly along the full length of the board.
If budget isn't a primary concern, a 22.5-degree lock-miter bit used the same way might work even better.
MLCS has both bits, and the camfer bit can be seen at
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/cat/Site/0014.html
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wrote:

...if I'm reading this right, I'd probably turn the faceframe upside down and run it through the TS on the short side...if the width is still an issue just grab a piece of ply and temp it up to serve for bearing...rather than run up against the fence, use a sacrificial board of some kind clamped to the fence, notched-out slighty to clear the blade...I'm thinking you have a left-tilt saw...
cg
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I'm not quite following this suggestion Charlie. I do have a left tilting blade. At full extension, I have about 24.5 inches from fence to blade. The face frame is 27" wide.

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On Fri, 01 May 2009 18:17:11 GMT, "Dick Snyder"

...yanno, after reading the other responses, I think your answer is in the sled idea...but you approach it from the non-fence side of the blade with your frame upside-down (yes, there'll be a bit of tearout, depending on sharpness and what species you're working with, but if you're paint grade that's not a problem)...just a piece of ply on runners with a rail to back it would be all you'd need.
On another tack, if you post your responses *after*...or on the bottom...of the post you are responding to, threads remain consistent and someone coming in late will be able to follow more easily...I'm sure with the crew in here, you'll find what's right for you...if anything, you'll gain appreciation for the fact that there are as many ways of doing something as there are people on the planet! LOL...
cg

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Sorry about posting my replies in the wrong place vis a vis the message being replied to.
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The PIA about that is there are so many twits out there that post something like "I agree" at the end of a 300 word post. This is made even worse by the people that don't use the > symbol on quoted text. Some of these at least use a line, though some just use a couple of spaces. In either case, you are left hunting for the end of one post and the beginning of another.
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wrote:

...we're singing from the same hymnal...the longer posts get, the more of a pain in the rear. <snipping> helps after all else fails...it takes some time for somebody to become familiar with netiquette...I'm still learning, too...
cg
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I don't have a jointer so I would do it on the TS with a sled I built for other purposes. Something along the lines of this to hold the piece vertical.
http://www.newwoodworker.com/pnlrasjig.html
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Limp Arbor wrote:

Yabbut (I love that term) if you run the panel vertically you can only achieve angles that leave the workpiece with bevels of 45 degrees or less. He needs a final bevel of 62-1/2 degrees (90 - 22-1/2).
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How ya figgur?
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Robatoy wrote:

I counted it out on my fingers.
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"Robatoy" wrote
Steve Turner wrote:

How ya figgur? ============================= I screwed up on this point myself awhile back in the wreck. And a number of folks pointed out that I was delusional and sorely lacking in math skills.
As Steve points out above, "He needs a final bevel of 62-1/2 degrees (90 - 22-1/2)". Well, by presenting the stock to the saw blade vertically, he has acheived his 90 degrees. And by cutting a bevel less than 45 degrees, he will achieve what is needed.
A lesson learned long ago, after much effort to do it other ways, is to look at all cuts from the saw's perspective. Get down to the level of the cutting table and look at it from the saw blades's perspective. Difficult cuts become more clear that way. You are not standing over it trying to figure it out from a vertical human perspective.
Ya know, a zen thing. You are the saw blade. You are wise in the ways of cutting. You know how to make this cut. Etc, etc. <VBG>
OK, I got it out of my system. I will now go back into curmudgeon mode now.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

I don't know what you guys are on about. He already has a mating (or gluing) surface that's 90 degrees from the face of the panel; if he runs the whole assembled frame through vertically (because he doesn't have enough fence capacity to run it through flat on the table) with the blade at "0" (90 degrees from the table), he can't cut *any* new mating surface, now can he? He needs to remove a 22-1/2 degree slice, but he would have to bevel the blade 67-1/2 degrees (sorry, I said 62-1/2 earlier) to get that, and last time I checked a table saw blade can only bevel up to 45 degrees. Am I missing something here? :-)
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I am making cuts on both mating surfaces at 22.5 degrees. That will give me maxiumum wood to wood contact and will give me an angle of 45 degrees from the face of the vanity to the shorter section.

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It WOULD be easier and I tried that on a test scrap. Then I realized that I had different width gluing surfaces but more importantly it would be difficult to cut a backer block with 22.5 degree angle cuts on each side to glue to the inside of the joint so it would press against the back of the joint to make a nice secure assembly. With a 45 degree glued to a 90 degree, the hypotunuse left after the 45 degree cut is just a hair over an inch glued to a 3/4" piece of wood.

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Yeah it is Friday.
You're right but he could easily make a sled that is at 22 1/2 deg and make the cut with the blade at 45. Or... make a 45deg sled and bevel the blade to 22 1/2 or... make a 30deg sled and ...
like this: http://tinyurl.com/dkechr or (watch wrap) http://books.google.com/books?id=TE1INaD65bwC&pg=PT56&lpg=PT56&dq=acute+angle+table+saw+rip&source=bl&ots=CzV6GD2e6f&sig=9T6Zd93l2isuaAUhgD9Ju_O_uM4&hl=en&ei=uTn7Sdz4KJjEMsLe0LwE&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5
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wrote:

I am a rack, I'm a piiiiiiinion... (my apologies to Mr. Paul Simon.)
The universe is the motor. In all reality, the board being cut, stands still. It is the saw and the entire room that is moving.

Thanks for the chuckle, grass-hoppa.
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wrote:

I don't have a jointer so I would do it on the TS with a sled I built for other purposes. Something along the lines of this to hold the piece vertical.
http://www.newwoodworker.com/pnlrasjig.html
This could work. I have not made a panel rasing jig though I have certainly seen plenty of plans for making one in addition to one Norm made at some point.
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