Can I cut crown molding on the table saw?

Building a wardrobe for my future daughter and made an attempt to cut crown molding for a decorative touch for the top. Never worked with crown molding before and didn't think it would be too difficult.
After ruining 1 piece with trial cuts I stopped and gave up. I managed to get 1 cut correct but I'm having trouble getting the mirror cut for the opposite piece.
The first cut was made with the blade set at 45 degrees holding the molding against an extended miter fence and the table saw table.
Should I just set the blade at 90 and use the miter fence at 45 and 135?
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The molding should be against the miter fence at the appropriate angle, the one at which it will be at when attached to the wall and ceiling, and the miter gauge set at 45 or 135.
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Possible, but be prepared to design and build some jigs to make the job easier, and *safer*.
It's well worth renting a miter saw if you don't have one ... preferably a compound miter saw. There is a world of information on the net on cutting crown molding, try Gary Katz's site for starters.
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I have a compound miter saw, and it works very well, but for stuff I am really concerned about I use a mitier box and a back saw, take my time and do it slowly. It works better with much less damage for things like thin strips to edge shelves, and I am sure that this approach would work fine for your molding.

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Modat22 wrote:

molding at the installed angle. My jig is a piece of thin plywood. On one side is a thin strip creating a lip to hold the piece being cut. On the other side there is a block of wood to lift the edge to create the installed angle. The jig has to be strong enough that it does not deform as you make the cuts.
To cut the pieces a sled on your table saw is the best, but I use a Right Angle Miter Gauge RAMG (Similar to Rockler #36461 ).
The sled would have both right and left side angle fences. To make the cut the you would place the jig on one fence for one angle and on the other fence for the other angle.
With the RAMG you place the jig against one face for the right side angle and on the other face for the left side angle. Rockler shows the RAMG pushing the piece for one angle and pulling the piece for the other angle. I have found that the easiest way is to cut the one angle on one side of the blade, flip the RAMG around to the slot on the other side of the blade and cut the other angle.
I have made many picture frames and found the RAMG to be quite accurate. I first cut each piece about a quarter inch long, and then bring the piece to the desired length with very precise shave cuts. For picture frames I staple the opposite side together before making the shave cuts. That way the opposite sides are exactly the same length.
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I would use a miter box and hand saw before I would try it on a table saw.
Mark
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 07:40:42 -0600, Modat22 wrote

I had a bunch of crown to install in a room with odd wall angles and a sloped ceiling. Lacking a compound miter, I did it all on the table saw.
There are two basic types of crown, the 45 deg. stuff and the 52/23 (I used the latter)
Check out: http://www.dewalt.com/us/articles/article.asp?Site=woodworking&ID=2
for a useful chart of table saw blade/miter angles.
The big drawback is support of the long pieces when you have to cut on the left side of your blade (for right tilt saws).
-Bruce
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The best tool here is a miter saw, or even a simple miter box with a handsaw. However, if you still like the table saw use a sled with runner(s) and a 45-degree stop.
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