Building a simple "bathroom mirror" cabinet

Page 1 of 2  
On Topic!
It won't be for the bathroom, actually, but for my daughter's room. I envision a shallow cabinet (for makeup and sundry paraphernalia) with a hinged mirrored door; like a panel door, but with a mirror where the panel would go. It would probably measure 18" x 24" x 4".
I'd like to think of a design that could be built simply, as I'd like my (17 y.o.) daughter to be able to do much of the building. That is in fact the main goal of the project. She seems up for it.
As this will be a case of the "partially-sighted leading the blind", I'm open to suggestions, but a couple of initial questions come to mind:
Will I need some sort of "backer" for the mirror, or could a sufficiently thick piece of glass suffice on its own? How should I hold it in? I assume a rabbet from behind the frame, and "points", if that's the right term.
I'm thinking of making the joinery simple by using pocket screws, even perhaps to assemble the door. Is this a stupid idea in any way?
Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No pocket screws for the door. It won't be strong enough for constant use that a teenager will put it through.
Either coped or M&T..
___You don't need a backing for the mirror___ but it is a good idea. If she were to stick something in that fell over and closed the door a little harder, and it happened to be in the middle it could break the glass. Unlikely but could.. With a clear piece of glass you would see the fallen object, with a mirror maybe not. Depends on how mature she is...
You could simply silicone the mirror in after finishing the project, not before. If you back it with wood you could use the silicone for the mirror in spots then points (for pictures and glass mounted on wood) for the backing. You use a screw driver to drive the points into the wood. The easiest method.
Having her build it would be great. I think every kid needs to learn something like this. What do you think you will use for shelves? Wood, glass? Adjustable?
On 6/14/2012 10:28 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg, here are the points that I am referring to. http://tinyurl.com/7kmhukq

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/12 9:43 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

Those points are made to hold glass underneath glazing. They aren't designed for screws. There a a bazillion other mirror clips designed for screws that would be much easier and hold better.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/2012 7:40 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

you can't use silicone on the back of mirror. it will eventually eat through the paint and silvering. if you're going to glue mirror to something, use mirror mastic instead. that's what it's designed for.
when i make stained glass panels with mirror in them, i use rubber cement to glue craft paper (heavy shopping paper bags, if small enough) to the back to protect against scratching through the paint and silvering. i do like the contact paper idea further downthread. that would prevent glass shards from spreading far if it broke in place.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The silicone was for the front rabbet. And not all silicone is the same.
Some will eat electrical components and some are made for electrical components... same deal with mirrors. Use one with out the acetic acid smell and it will be fine.
Same with the push points, they were meant to back up the silicone to the front bead. So if installed in the back they are just reinforcing the silicone which is way strong.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/2012 10:40 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

I'm not sure yet. I don't think they'll need to be adjustable though. If I can stomach the extra complication, I may consider some sort of external tray at the bottom - something with a lip, or possibly even drilled holes (a "tool rack" if you will) to hold whatever primping supplies are in use at the moment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/12 9:28 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I just built one of these and it is indeed a really simple woodworking project. <https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/LQ5LO8Gml3TdhSlEj8PDP9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

You absolutely want a backer. Most mirrors (probably all sold at glass stores) will already have one applied. If you're recycling an old mirror that does not, it could be as simple as some thick contact paper. Don't listen to anyone who says you don't need it. Of course you don't "need" it... you don't "need" seat belts either. :-)

I recycled some mirror holding clips from an old framed mirror. They were simple pieces of hardened spring metal held on by small screws. There are a million different mirror clips out there.

Pocket screws are very strong, but I usually glue the joint if I know it's going to be permanent. Pocket holes are a great way to clamp a joint if you don't have a lot of clamps. For the box on my cabinet, I used simple rabbet/dado joint.
http://www.timberframe-tools.com/ref/handwork-wood/images/266-26.png
Pocket holes/glue could work for the door as well. If you decide on mitered corner joints, cut the recess/rabbet for the mirror in the stock before you cut it into the tops and sides. For square corner joints, like rail & stile cabinet doors, you may not want to put in the recess until after you cut the pieces, because they will be stopped on two pieces.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/2012 10:29 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

<https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/LQ5LO8Gml3TdhSlEj8PDP9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink
Beautifully done on all counts, Mike.

What he said ...
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/12 2:45 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

It's not a matter of holding up. No backer will keep glass from breaking. It's a matter of safely. If the mirror breaks, the backer holds it together and keeps the sharp pieces from flying all over the place. Not that one will likely injure you in the process of flying, but we're talking about a room in which you spend most of your time barefoot. How many times have you broken a glass in the kitchen, swept the entire floor and still found stray pieces a week later?
But lets say you do slip and fall and put your hand up to catch yourself and it goes into the mirror on the medicine cabinet. You are much less likely to put your hand through the mirror with a good, adhered backer.
Sure, we all have had shower doors for years and years and they've never broken... but man, just think if one did when you slipped in the shower. Thank God those things are tempered glass. Heck, I might even consider tempered glass for a moving mirror.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/2012 2:08 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

tempered shower doors can spontaneously deconstruct with no warning nor any sudden hit. frequently no one is in the room when they go off.
<http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/2012/06/13/dnt-iowa-exploding-shower-glass-door.kcci?iref=allsearch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/12 4:41 PM, chaniarts wrote:

<http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/2012/06/13/dnt-iowa-exploding-shower-glass-door.kcci?iref=allsearch
Yes, and who got hurt? Oh that's right, nobody. :-) And if someone did get hurt when this 1 in 10 million occurrence happened, a band aid or a couple stitches probably took care of it. If shower doors were not tempered, we'd likely see several deaths a year.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/2012 9:28 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Seriously consider finding and buying the mirror first, then build the project to the mirror. Usually cheaper in the long run, and a better fit.
It will be a cherished moment to build it with you daughter.
My youngest daughter and I did this one together in her sophomore year in high school. It was her first design attempt and, ten years later and after boomeranging back from college, and a couple of years on her own, it is still her own bedside table:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/BedsideStand1.JPG
Good luck, and carry through with the joint father/daughter building of the project, you will cherish the memory forever, guaranteed.
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/2012 2:14 PM, Swingman wrote:

Thanks. I'm a novice, but that's the way my mind works too.

Looks great, but *I'd* probably need to be the "student" on a project like that. :)

I think it's a great idea, and overdue as well, but exactly the kind of thing that usually gets pushed aside by the demands of everyday life. Your encouragement above is much appreciated. Maybe it will help keep the idea on the front burner long enough to make it happen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" wrote in message
On 6/14/2012 9:28 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Seriously consider finding and buying the mirror first, then build the project to the mirror. Usually cheaper in the long run, and a better fit. ============================================================Yes, get the mirror first. Even if custom cut, the mirror might not be quite the dimension planned for.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Guarino wrote:

I don't know if you NEED a backer but I'd put one. Probably 1/8" lauan ("door skin"). I'd use 1/8" mirror too...set both into a 1/4" rabbet iin the back of a mortise & tenon frame, hold them in place with thin wood strips glued on. I'm suggesting the light, thin mirror in case the frame joinery isn't quite up to snuff; you can get plastic mirror too...it is light weight but scratches fairly easily.

OK for the box, not so good for door. If you use it for the door I'd suggest 1/4" T&G for the frame members too.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/14/2012 4:17 PM, dadiOH wrote:

I appreciate the subtle hint that the door will need to be especially precise to accept glass, especially as my skills are modest. But the flatness of the mirror is probably non-negotiable. (I know my "client" well) I believe I can lay my hands on a suitably-sized piece of old, but never used, 1/4" glass mirror.

I'm trying to imagine how that would work. Are you suggesting putting the glass in the groove?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Guarino wrote:

No, I was thinking of T&G just where the rails & stiles meet. I guess you could go full out on them and put the glass in. Just don't ever break it :)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK. Indulge my ignorance for a moment then. How would I make the stopped mortise? 1/4" straight router bit?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Guarino wrote:

That would work. So would a chisel.
After further thought, I would scrap the T&G or mortice/tenon and make half lap joints. Dead easy to make, lots of glue surface, will survive when others fail. So would a bridle joint but the half lap is less work and just as good.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.