Building a shop

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I would be concerned about moisture reeking up through the gravel and rusting the tools and surrounding your project wood with a higher moisture content than you may want.
If you are not too off the beaten path often times you can make an arrangement with the local concrete company to let them dump their surplus at your place. Obviously this assumes that you and a helper will be present and available during their business hours. They want to dump the surplus, wash out the hopper and be on their way.
This is how I got footings 2 ft wide and 3 ft deep for my shop expansion at no cost as well as several foundations for out buildings and a boat ramp 75 ft long, 8 ft wide and 8 inched thick on my pond.
My worst experience was when they showed up with 3 trucks with over 18 yards total at one time!
Don Dando

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I'm curious, what is the going rate for surplus?
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That greatly depends on the location and where it will be delivered. do you live near him?
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down on the corner, you know where to eat
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Don Dando wrote:

If the floor is well above the water table then cement woudl be worse. Condensation can sink through the gravel but will sit on the surface of the cement.
If the water table is high enough for moisture to creep up through the floor it is a bad location for a building and the floor should be built above grade, regardless of the type.
Dust will be a PIA with a gravel floor. Once the sawdust as thick enough you could seep most of it off without losing much gravel, but by no means all. Heck, once the sawdust was thick enough you could saturate it with linseed oil, compact it, and have a linoleum floor. Might take a few years to cure without baking it though.
--

FF


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I've often wondered if a floor of rock dust and cement, mixed dry & poured over coarse gravel, then compacted, and moistened with a fine mist would provide a servicable floor? It would be a sort of mortar mix over the rock. Rock dust compacts easily and can be very smooth. Would it work?
Jim in the Bluegrass
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Gravel?? How do you set shop tools on a gravel floor?
I just finished a 24x32 shop/garage. The slab floor was $4000. It is fiberglass renforced, has re-bar per code and plastic under liner. That also included a 6 foot x 24 foot apron in front of the doors. The roof is truss built and we hoisted them with a stick boom fork lift. Also used that to raise the walls. All built by an old man (me) and my 25 year old son.
You can see the results at http://users.adelphia.net/~larrydrum / There are a few build process photos up there right now.
Bubba
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x-no-archive:yes
Man that is nice!. That is ecaxtly what I want. The siding even matches my house. If you dont mind me asking, how much did that set you back and how long did it take you to build? Is there sotrage in the roof area? Did you have to have a footer? Bubba Wood wrote:

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If you're a) going to buy trusses and b) want storage above, I would consider an attic truss rather than the "W" truss that Bubba used. I'm planning a garage rebuild this year. Unfortunately, I'm in a suburban area with a few more regulations than you have. Pre-built trusses are almost forbidden here.
todd
wrote:

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todd wrote:

He could go with a scissor truss and have more headroom. Attics tend to accumulate stuff that's not touched until you die.
JP
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todd wrote:

That's interesting because it seems to be more common for building codes to require pre-built trusses.
--

FF


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Well, I didn't say it had to make sense. Like the fact that per code here, the eave on my house can't extend over the 5' easement at the edge of our property, but the outside of a fireplace can. There is a lot of teardown activity in my town, and I don't think I've ever seen a pre-built truss. We're outside Chicago, and I'm sure it takes more union labor to stick-build a roof than to hang some trusses. ;-) On the plus side, I think I can wind up with a bit more usable space in the attic with a stick-build roof.
todd
todd
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todd wrote:

Aha!
Hit the nail on the head I daresay.
--

FF


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stryped, This is just my opinion and since it is free take it for what its worth ..... From your comments regarding the entire construction process, I think that you should not attempt to build this structure by yourself. Before you begin you need to educate yourself in basic construction at a level much greater than this news group can provide. Even then the book knowledge is not the same as being able to apply it in a practical sense. Reading a chapter on floating the finish of the concrete is very different from doing it. But the book knowledge will allow you to converse with contractors. While you may not have to deal with a building inspector or comply with "city" codes in your location you should not take that as the OK to just do it how ever you want to. In general building codes and inspections are not necessarily bad, they make sure the structure is safe and built to a minimum specification. The questions you have asked indicate that you do not have any experience in basic structural construction, if there is a construction site in in your area, particularly if it is a new home being built you should check it out and really look at the way it is being put together from the ground up. While I am not familiar with the type of foundations that are typically used in your area, if you can observe the construction steps of a concrete slab foundation you will see the footer and probably beams being dug into the soil, the beams will most likely have static tension cables in addition to the rebar. I am not saying that tension cables are necessary but you will need to do the soil / site preparation appropriate for your area, a compacted sand base will probably need to be installed even if excavation of beams is not required. A vapor barrier under the concrete would be essential. Regardless of the exact construction techniques that are appropriate for your soil conditions in my opinion rebar is cheap when you are building a foundation, use extra, it will be money well spent. Some utilities installed before the foundation is poured will be appreciated for years down the road, well placed floor plugs can be very handy, even if you do not plan to install electricity in the floor initially if you install conduit you can pull wire later. Some running water inside the shop would also be a great feature. Then there is the general electrical wiring and breaker box, do you know how to install the electrical service ? You will need to calculate loads and make sure the appropriate sized wiring is correctly installed. Concrete is not especially hard to work with if you know what you are doing, if you don't you will wind up with one big concrete mess. Breaking up concrete and hauling it off is not any fun under any circumstances. If you do not know how to work with a normal mix product I do not think you will stand any chance of success with some of high strength specialty mixes that have been mentioned in this thread. Electrical wiring is not especially hard either but there is a right way to do it, and it needs to be done correctly. If you are actually going to build a shop you should at least be pleased with it when it is finished. Just from the posts you have made in this thread I think you need the help of professionals. Just my 2 cents worth, hopefully you will think about some of the concerns I have pitched out there.
Charlie
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The total cost was in the 25k range. YMMV. I got caught having to buy over priced Katrina OSB. From first shipment to second OSB went from 9.90 to 14.90 here in Atlanta. And I needed 70 sheets. The whole building is sheeted in OSB, inside and out and insulated. It can be built for less $$$ it all just depends what you want.
It took 3 1/2 months of part time work to build. We started Sept 15. My son worked on it full time for 3 weeks, I helped hime for 6 days of that. IN that time we got the building raised, had the roofing installed by pros, put up the osb outside, installed the windows and doors, then he left. I did all the rest myself through the winter. We had our final on Jan 5.
Oh the siding also matches my house, Im in a subdivision with rules too. THe roof/attic has no storage except what you can lay across the trusses. They are "W" trusses. I guess I could sheet a section in the center, it is 8 feet tall there. Maybe later. :)
Bubba

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Oops... I missed the footer question. Yes there are footers, per code or a little more. The slab is a monolithic pour. The footers are 24" deep and 12" wide. The whole thing is also well above grade. In fact it is built on the high point of the lot, higher than the house.
Bubba

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Looks nice. Good job Bubba. I bet it is nice to work in a dedicated shop like this.
Why the gaps between the drawers in your cabinets along the wall. Or lack of doors on the other cabinets?
I do like the built in platforms for the miter saw, etc.
Also, why no paint on the walls? White paint lightens the place up and increases visibility. And is easier on the eyes than OSB.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

I like the industrial look of OSB. In DreamShop 1.0 I'll probably paint some trompe l'oeil trim or something and then seal the whole lot of it.
JP
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On Thu, 9 Mar 2006 10:22:36 -0500, "Lee Michaels"

the drawers and built out doors to match for the rest. Painted the whole ehing brite white and added a 5/4 hardwood edge to the double thick top. I'll post more photos later.

about holding up the 10 foot cut off. BTW, 12 feet on each side of the Miter saw. 16 and 8 for the RAS

doubt it now. I should of done it when I painted the outside with the big airless sprayer but I didn't, couldn't cuz we already had the inside half full of stuff. PLus the biggest reason is again money... I had a choice of interior paint or that Jet Lathe... :) You can see which one won.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

unfortunately my quick posting from yesterday did not make it through our firewall, so another quick post:
i had a pole building, exactly as you describe, put up last year. i would highly recommend that you have someone do it for you--but i admire your initiative. another recommendation is that you consider "clear span" joists (i.e., engineered i-beams). you'll have a lot more attic space than even an attic truss would yield. (especially if you have a 1 or 2 foot kick wall built.)
the building, so far, has cost roughly $21k....there's a fortune to be saved in doing all the interior, electrical, and painting yourself.
i put up a quick summary of the construction of the building this past december. it can be found at:
http://users.adelphia.net/~kimnach/Outbuilding/Outbuilding.htm
good luck.
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